Schools of playing

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by tpter1, Dec 15, 2005.

  1. tpter1

    tpter1 Forte User

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    As I was going through my routine this am, a thought crossed my mind on schools of playing.

    There are lots of posts written on Chicago school, NY school, et al.

    What are the differences between these schools? Also, and maybe Wilmer could help us out a bit on this, who were the principal teachers of these schools...why are they so named?

    Thanks...
     
  2. Derek Reaban

    Derek Reaban Mezzo Piano User

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    Jun 16, 2005
    Tempe, Arizona
    Great ideas are great ideas regardless of where they originate. I’m certainly not an authority, but I’ve experienced lots of different pieces from many of the different schools of thought.

    For Chicago I think of Vincent Cichowicz’s air patterns and the idea of not “bearing down†on the sound. Anything Arnold Jacobs has written or recorded (great ideas about breathing and the mental and musical approaches to making music). Mr. Herseth’s impeccable sound model!

    For New York I think about the ideas I gleaned from David Krauss’s presentation at the ITG conference in Denver. Resonance, Floating the Tone, Posture, etc (I’m certain that Jim Pandolfi fits into this picture as does Mark Gould and Peter Bond). William Vacchiano and solfege and the ability to transpose anything by sight. Max Schlossberg and his collection of great exercises.

    For the Philadelphia School I think about Marcel Tabuteau and William Kinkaid and their amazing ideas about phrasing (this strongly influenced Arnold Jacobs). Although these are wind players their ideas took hold with lots of brass players. I think these ideas are strongly present in much of what Michael Sachs teaches.

    The Remington influence from Eastman. The ideas of relaxation and resonance are exceptionally well presented in his written text (Hunsberger). These ideas tie directly into Tabuteau, Krauss, Herseth, Gould, Pandolfi, Thompson, etc.

    Applying breath attacks from a pedagogical standpoint. This one is really big too, and I’m not sure where it would fall (I think it transcends the “school†pigeon holing). Hickman, Caruso, Reinhardt, Charles Vernon, Stamp, etc.

    Playing the leadpipe to help establish immediacy of response, and a resonant buzzy quality that transfers to the horn (Adam, Hyram Lammers). This falls into the “let the horn play the lips, not the lips play the horn†school of thought. Lots of overlap with the different schools here!

    From a time management perspective, the Claude Gordon books lay out a very well conceived approach to practice. Learning from his example and tailoring personal practice schedules is certainly something that crosses all “schoolsâ€, but getting a glimpse of his thoroughness is certainly worth mentioning.

    I’m sure this one will be an interesting read as it develops. Looking forward to Wilmer, Ed, and Manny’s contributions too!

    EDIT:

    I also hope that PH will give the very important overview of separating the conscious mind from the subconscious to allow the body to just do what it knows how to do. This falls into Caruso and Adam (clearly), and many other schools too. I would be remiss to leave this EXTREMELY IMPORTANT idea out of my post
     
  3. Derek Reaban

    Derek Reaban Mezzo Piano User

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    This is something that I posted recently that really goes to the heart of the breathing from the Chicago School. I thought I would repost it here:

    To expand on that, you are in the company of many great players who advocate that concept. Here are some quotes that I really like related to this topic:

    Manny Laureano – Principal Trumpet Minnesota Orchestra

    Jay Friedman – Principal Trombone Chicago Symphony Orchestra
     
  4. tpter1

    tpter1 Forte User

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    Thanks, guys.

    There does seem to be quite a bit of overlap.

    I'm not overly concerned with which school who is; just merely want to know a bit more about the concept of various schools of playing and how it came about. Just so I could be a bit more conversant or at least have some clue about what people mean when they say "Oh...he's Chicago school."

    I found it an interesting thought, but not one which I want to dwell on and pidgeon-hole myself or any other players into.
     

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