Screamers mouthpiece

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by NESS925, Sep 30, 2010.

  1. ewanmains

    ewanmains Piano User

    285
    50
    Jun 9, 2009
    Kilmarnock, UK
    I think part of what Nick is saying as well is that, if you have a good setup, then your range should be pretty much the same on a deep cup or a shallow cup.

    If you find you have to rely on a tiny shallow piece to play higher, then you're not doing it right! (see various other posts on here about excessive pressure, etc.,)

    Range is range, sound is sound - don't confuse the two.

    :-)
     
  2. NickD

    NickD Forte User

    Thanks, folks, for letting me voice my opinions and ideas (not to be confused with facts!!! ;-) )!

    Ewan, that's EXACTLY what I'm addressing. Your range should be about the same on any mouthpiece. I can hit a clean DHC on a Bach1B with a big hole, but it isn't nearly as loud as on my new Wedge prototype. Also, if I try to bring the same kind of heat on the 1B as I can bring on the Wedge, I might end up letting my form get sloppy and pressing more to try to get a great big mouthpiece (relative to MY chops) to work like my lead rig.

    Ok, onwards and upwards! ;-)

    Nick
     
  3. Markie

    Markie Forte User

    2,156
    15
    Jan 4, 2009
    Clarksburg, WV
    There are mouthpieces that can help with the upper register but if you suck, no amount of equipment will help. With that said, you need to have a certain level of proficiency to scream.
    As for me, I bought a Kelly "screamer" a couple years ago and it does make playing in the upper register easier.
    I also own a Asymmetric which I bought over 10 years ago and it will scream till the cows come home.
    My normal mouthpiece? A Bach 10 1/2 C. A size I've used for over 35 years and it screams. Do I still use the other mouthpieces? No.
    See what I'm saying?
    Yes, I still have both mouthpieces. They sit in my mouthpiece case with about 20 other mouthpieces ranging from Monettes to H.W. White.
    Be careful seeking a magical mouthpiece. There are basically two types of people that look for screamer mouthpieces:
    1) Those that are already effective and can scream with their regular mouthpiece and are looking for a mouthpiece that's more efficient.
    2)Those who are ineffective and can't scream on their regular mouthpiece.
    They often desperately seek for a mechanical way to achieve this. What these individuals almost always find is that the secret to high notes isn't a secret and it can't be bought.
    You have to be effective before you can be efficient.
    With that said, try this:
    Go to a music store that sells mouthpieces and take your horn with you. Ask if you can try various mouthpieces and try them out just like you'd try on shoes. Once you find a mouthpiece that "fits" you'll feel it.
    I promise, if you try several mouthpieces of different sizes you'll come across at least one that will cause you to say "Hey! I like this mouthpiece. I can play in all the registers and it feels good"
    That's the one you want.
    Don't let anyone tell you what fits. You decide what fits.
    Once you find one that fits, then start working on your range.
     
  4. ewanmains

    ewanmains Piano User

    285
    50
    Jun 9, 2009
    Kilmarnock, UK
    Hi Markie,

    Lots of sense here, IMHO, I would say the opposite of the above though - you have to be efficient before you can be effective. It's the inefficiency that causes people to seek the 'magic bullet' .

    Once you have an efficient set-up, then you can start playing about with sounds. As general advice (again IMHO), until you can honestly say/feel that you have an efficient setup, then the best you can do for a mouthpiece is to find one that offers you the greatest comfort. Sound & range will then develop naturally instead of being forced by using extreme equipment.

    A good indicator of this (I find) is funnily enough, trying out extreme equipment! Play some scales as high as you can go on a big, deep mouthpiece, then try the same on a small, shallow piece, you should get roughly the same result . For example, the top of your range on a 1B takes exactly the same effort as on a 14A4a. (very different sounds though)

    :-)
     
  5. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

    6,792
    3,558
    Oct 26, 2003
    Baltimore/DC
    To all of the naysayers in this thread, don't believe them! The trick is to go out and buy the smallest mouthpiece you can find, and when you get it, just go for it. If at first it doesn't seem to be working, pull back really hard - remember, more pressure is better because it takes a lot of pressure to squeeze out those really high notes.

    A couple of mouthpieces you could try:

    Jet Tone: Anything really
    Schilke: 6A4a
    Rudy Muck: any one you can get your hands on
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2010
  6. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

    6,792
    3,558
    Oct 26, 2003
    Baltimore/DC
    Now that isn't necessarily true. Steven Seagal has small feet for his size of 6'4" and when he runs he looks like he has bees on him.
     
  7. jbkirby

    jbkirby Forte User

    1,115
    159
    Sep 10, 2009
    Dothan, Alabama
    (tobylou8, Here I go again!)

    Does anyone remember: "Run faster, jump higher in your P.F. Flyers??" I got some and still lost footraces with my buddies. Same with the 'screamer' mouthpieces and playing high notes.

    As a comeback player, I too, bought a "screamer" mouthpiece, a Schilke 6a4a. All it did for me was make my sound very empty and "tinny" and I lost the timbre of the instrument. Granted: at first I was able to play the higer notes with greater ease, but I quickly returned to my regular Parduba #4. With practice I have been able to reach an E above the staff, on a good day. In doing so, I have assured a solid D above the staff, which is all I should ever really need. I stick to fundamentals: long single notes, striving to keep the tone steady with no waivering; Lip slurs starting at pedal notes and working my way up the chromatic scale; articulation exercises to sound notes clearly. The best part is that I have a great time doing all of this and the results are showing.

    Get a good teacher who is familiar with and able to play such high notes, thus having first-hand knowledge, stick to the fundametals, practice smart and often and you will see results!
     
  8. jbkirby

    jbkirby Forte User

    1,115
    159
    Sep 10, 2009
    Dothan, Alabama
    rofl
     
  9. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

    6,792
    3,558
    Oct 26, 2003
    Baltimore/DC
    JB, it's clear that when you used that 6A4a you simply weren't trying hard enough. I mean, sometimes you really have to pull - put that little finger in the hook and visualize a hydraulic press, squeezing the flesh of your lips into the small cup. Also, blow really really really (really really) hard! That's how it's done! The secret is out!
     
  10. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

    6,792
    3,558
    Oct 26, 2003
    Baltimore/DC
    ** Obviously I'm kidding.

    In my experience a smaller mouthpiece never gave me any more range that I didn't already have. It made my sound brighter and facilitated the range (a bit less effort) and thus helped with endurance, but changing mouthpieces, and specifically changing to smaller mouthpieces, for me has typically been more of a hindrance than a help.
     

Share This Page