Section Leader Tips?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by SophiaPetrillosBuddy, Nov 22, 2014.

  1. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    and the most glaring thing Rowuk writes is """Sophia, I think that you have moved yourself too close to the problem and that you need to take a step back.""" ----

    you know Sophia maybe old Rowuk is correct --- BUT I HAPPEN to think he is 100% wrong here ---- I think perhaps you need to become closer to this young girl, to befriend her, to help her --- I dont' necessarily think it's laziness like ole Rowuk does here ((( but luckily on a forum like this we can disagree with one another))) and we are NOT ACTUALLY in your shoes -------- when you find out the real reason behind the obstacles in this girls life -- then I suspect you are well on your way to helping her solve those difficulties in her life ---- and BOTH of you will be better people as the result
     
  2. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Holy cow. This is just a high school band. It doesn't have to be complicated. You should be able to come into rehearsal, take your horn out of the case and enjoy yourself. IMO it's not the section leader's job to be a motivational counselor or dynamic leader of people. My suggestion is just to ignore her and see where that leads.
     
  3. SophiaPetrillosBuddy

    SophiaPetrillosBuddy New Friend

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    Again, thanks for the advice (and the laugh, tobylou8)! I don't know who's right, so I'm going to take bits and pieces of everything, and see how that works.
     
  4. fels

    fels Piano User

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    kehaulani is closest to the answer IMHO. A high school band is comprised of developing individuals, including the section leader. Back in the day (1960s) i was first chair but had no responsibilities relative to the section, other than setting a playing example. Now i am section leader of a communty band with folks who have all types of experiences. The Sl position requires all sorts of personal and psychological skills that are likely beyond the HS level. Just play. Set an example. Help with all questions in a humble way.
     
  5. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    IMO the matter lays entirely with the band director, whereas he/she has the entire responsibility and is paid and/or holds that position for such. Thinking back, I was flabbergasted just to be selected by the high school band director to be in the high school band while I was still only in the eighth grade, albeit the band director had also been my instructor in the lower grades and my private tutor all the way through high school. Simplest, we played whatever music as was distributed to each of us by him without our regard to what part it was. Such negated competition with our band mates. Certainly, I was confident that I could have played lead by the time I was a sophomore as I was often doing so while being tutored.
     
  6. Newell Post

    Newell Post Piano User

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    SophiaPetrillosBuddy:

    I'm 60 years old now, something that seems like a mathematical impossibility. I've never been a full-time professional musician. But even after 40+ years, I'm still friends with people who were in my band and my section when I was section leader in high school. Ignore the few mean-spirited comments above. Regardless of what you do or don't do with music later in life, HS band is the best groundwork many people have for learning how to work with other people in a complex organization toward a common goal. Even if you never play another note after HS band, you will find yourself working in similar groups most of your life. You are wise to recognize the nature of the problem and to ask intelligent questions about how to handle it.
     
  7. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    As I'm now 78, sadly not that many of my high school band mates are still alive, the reality being that of 106 in my high school graduating class of 106, as of this past summer only 48 are and I'm one of that 48. Only 9 were in my high school band and I'm one of those also, and I'm still in e-mail contact with 4 of the others and get a Christmas card from a 5th. My USPS mail box is regularly filled with letters from those I served with in the military and law enforcement and likewise with E-mail.

    Still, I'll say if one is well trained there are significantly fewer problems to cope with regardless of what endeavor one now has. In the military, if one deduces a problem, the path to resolution is to take it to the commander. President Harry Truman made such a point with his statement, "The buck stops here".

    In two separate endeavors, I am the Chief Executive, but will honestly say I've a very competent staff in each that seldom requires my direct intervention, yet near daily I'm apprised of their performance.
     
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I really agree with this. Still, every encounter in life is an opportunity and in school band many things simply work better when they are organized. The art of being section leader is also one that needs practice - especially to move conflict away from the rehearsal time. In my professional life, there are many first chair musicians with NO PEOPLE SKILLS and the music often suffers because of that. Of course, leadership only can flourish in an environment that lets it. The bandleader is key in getting that done.


     
  9. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    wow --- Ole KT here wishes he could have gone to a high school like that -- uncomplicated, and take your horn out and have fun ------- But, alas, I will admit, we probably had one of the most musical and astute band directors East of the Mississippi when I was in band (circa late 70's, early 80's) ----- even though the guy played trombone --- he was brilliantly talented. YOU SEE PEOPLE, I came from a small rural town, but they had a nationally known Drum and Bugle Corps -- so everything in band, jazz band had to be EXACT, there was NO MARGIN for error. --- the band sounded great, we had the utmost in discipline, and I'll wager we had the most talented high school musicians in the state --- especially for a small school of less than 150 per class ----- but alas, I can't say band was FUN ---- but we worked hard, we played well ------
     
  10. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    I have to also say --- we generally didn't have section leaders "assigned" -----but the director always had first chair musicians (or several of the first chair musicians) -- who could on a moments notice play any passage with "clarity, precision, dynamics" and pretty much perfect ((gosh darn drum and bugle people) ---- BUT how could you argue with that -------------------------- so when any member of any section didn't play the part correctly, usually the "first chair" would be asked to demonstrate --- I don't think there was competition for the most part ---- but we strived to be better, to earn the respect of our peers, and to make sure our section was the "tightest" most in synched section in the band ------------------------------------------ BUT IT WASNT ALWAYS FUN ----- sad, but true.

    I suppose, that's why I error on the side of the young lady having trouble playing ---- is perhaps, there is a level of frustration in her life that contributes to that -- just my thoughts
     

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