Self Education in Orchestral Repetoire

Discussion in 'Orchestra / Solo / Chamber Music' started by Iamtrpt, Oct 30, 2005.

  1. Iamtrpt

    Iamtrpt New Friend

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    May 16, 2005
    Hi Mr. Laureano,

    I had a question about how you approached college auditions and stuff. Did you have a vast knowledge of repetoire when you walked in for the audition for Mr. V? Did you listen to tons of tapes to prepare yourself for a orchestral career? I've been really piling on the stuff in to try to get the standard rep. down ya know? Like identifying all of Beethoven's symphonies, and Dvorak's Slavonic Dances and stuff... Even if you didn't do that do you think it'll help me when I'm going to college?

    Thanks
    Liam

    Oh yeah, I fixed my hand position (especially with the help of my teacher) the dexterity is better. And well not to throw this thread off balance, I'm starting the Arturian. And I've heard different styles of approaching it, how would you approach it?
     
  2. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Sep 29, 2004
    USA
    Well, Iam, I knew a lot of repertoire but from playing it, not excerpt books or tons of listening to orchestral music. I was in a youth orchestra and i played in my school orchestra which played very difficult repertoire. I got into Juilliard because I was the only kid that played the second Brandenburg and a Brandt etude. I had no idea that I was going to become an orchestral player. I just wanted to play the trumpet better so I could do it for a living, I didn't particularly care how.

    One good way to start the Arutunian is to learn to spell it! You can do it, it's not that hard. Past that, find a recording of Timofey Dokshitzer, the most famous of the great Russian trumpet soloists, and you'll hear the style he uses to play that piece. Have you been working on double tongue? How's your endurance? Have you got a vibrato? How's your pianissimo playing? These are all skills needed to play that piece. The piece helps motivate you learn those techniques but shouldn't be the vehicle you use to learn them. That's why you have an Arban book.

    Good luck!

    ML
     
  3. oj

    oj Pianissimo User

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    Sep 9, 2005
    Norway
    Apropos spelling.

    I got an email from Timofei Dokshizer some years ago. He was unhappy with all the different spelling of his name in Europe, USA, etc.

    He had decided that he wanted this version:

    Timofei Dokshizer

    Btw, the Arutunian Concerto in Ab is on the CD The Best of Timofei Dokshizer on the label Marcophon, CD 954-2

    This CD can be hard to find. But if you go to this website, you will find it:

    http://www.reift.ch/

    Search for "Dokshitser", or go to this link and click on the last item:

    http://www.reift.ch/accueil.php?p=cd_article&cat=8


    Ole
     
  4. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Sep 29, 2004
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    Yeah, you're right but I guess that's the problem with transliteration to English. There are so many possibilities, all correct, for producing sounds in this language that it's almost impossible to agree on a spelling without the person expressing a preference as he did.

    I'm trying to imagine reading that name without ever having heard it and unless I knew what to do with the vowels and the "z", I would have many choices. German and Italian are unique in how they use that letter. I think the only word we use in English with the "z=ts" is pizza! I can't think of any other popular word.

    And then, what does one on America or England do with "ei"? If you are of German background the instinct is to say "eye" but if you're of Jewish ancestry you'll likely say "A" (like baby).

    That's life in the world's greatest melting pot!

    ML
     
  5. Iamtrpt

    Iamtrpt New Friend

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    May 16, 2005
    Have you been working on double tongue? How's your endurance? Have you got a vibrato? How's your pianissimo playing?

    The last year I've been really trying to perfect that. It's almost there. This past year (counting junior year) I've been piling on the hours probably on average four to five a day (not continuously, but with breaks in between). Yeah I got a vibrato but I had to work my a** off to get one. Well for pianissimo, what I've been doing are my longtones in different ways. On each note hold it either 8 to sixteen (counting how I'm feeling that day) and crescendo from 1 to 8 and then decrescendo from 8 to 16 or 8 to 1. Doing scales and such.

    Shoot. Which reminds me. I have to work on transposition.

    Thanks Mr. Laureano[/quote]
     
  6. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Sep 29, 2004
    USA
    Great,

    Give me an idea of the three toughest solos you've played with which you were happy.

    Thanks,

    ML
     
  7. Iamtrpt

    Iamtrpt New Friend

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    May 16, 2005
    Well there's probably only one that I've been really proud of myself playing is the Hindemith which took me forever to perfect. I've been working on orchestral excerpts (Pictures, Mahler) and what not for now, but I have to beef up my solo repetoire. You played the Brandenberg? I heard that was freakin' hard! And you were only in highschool? Dang I want to go to your highschool! I don't know...my Dad teaches me trumpet and he's kind of a perfectionist so I haven't been able to learn much solos anyway.

    Back to transposing...

    Thanks
    Liam
     

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