Self practice

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by hichez, May 26, 2011.

  1. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    In my case that's just the way it was - circumstances during my formative years prohibited private instruction. For one, I didn't live in a place where I had an instructor other than my many band directors. (5 in 4 years of high school - unfortunately it was like a revolving door) I did have 6 months of instruction at the Armed Forces School of Music, but it was clear that I wasn't the instructor's pet pupil, so even though I did learn, that relationship was somewhat strained at best.

    After that, I was working as a musician, and I suppose I could have taken lessons from one of the many top-rated players in the area, but I was young and life was trucking along, and frankly, I was doing quite well on my own. (I was also keeping my eyes and ears open, and was picking the brains of the people I was playing with who were better than me)

    Keep in mind that I never said it was ideal. I probably limited my potential by not doing private instruction over an extended period of time, but I've always been functional, and I've always gigged - isn't that the goal?
     
  2. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    lets see -- in the mid 70's to 80's when I was in public schools here in the USA -- I had a few teachers, passionate in their own right, but geared towards classical, and concert band --- and the theory that ALL students need to learn "this way" to provide a practical understanding and the BASIC tenets of that style of music. A clarinetist, and a trombonists -- who would scoff at Maynard and HIS style, like many people do here on TM -- they would also scoff (for whatever reason) at the likes of Doc Severensin because he was a great player -- but he transitioned to so many different styles that was apparanently not an accepted method of playing trumpet -- ie the teachers idea (you are a jazz, a concert band, a marching band, etc -- but you need not learn it all))
    hey that is my opinion-- these teachers did a great job for involving many different students and many different instruments -- HOWEVER they failed to promote the idea that MOST STUDENTS CAN GO SO MUCH FURTHER THAN THEY THOUGHT THEY COULD -- in that end -- I wonder how many budding artists did they end up eliminating from the music arena?????????????????
     
  3. hichez

    hichez Pianissimo User

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    It seems that I should just continue to the best of my ability. Seems like everyone had flashback to their school days. lol
     
  4. Satchmo Brecker

    Satchmo Brecker Piano User

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    I'd say save your money and don't worry so much about getting a teacher. It sounds like at your level of playing the teacher would mostly be "tweaking" versus teaching fundamentals of music, playing, etc. And if you need a "life coach" like rowuk's teacher(s), well get a life coach. AND there's no guarantee that the teacher is even a) a good player, b) a good player and a good teacher, and c) a good player, teacher, who's right for you. You could get a teacher that wants nothing to do with X even though you want X.

    I had two teachers (on sax), one in high school, one in college. The one in high school "coached" most of the lesson...and I thought, what a waste of money. He was a highly recommended professor at a local college. The guy in college was also highly recommended, well known player, head of the sax dept at the college, and he wanted nothing to do with jazz.
     
  5. veery715

    veery715 Utimate User

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    There is no one solution and there are teachers who can and those who can't. Everything is a C^&pshoot and nothing is assured, so trying anything new is a matter of chance.

    I'm with ROWUK on the value-added of a good teacher, but I am also in my 60s and have two great teachers from whom I have received much more than trumpet/music lessons. That makes me fortunate.

    But as I wrote earlier, if you really want something, the only one standing in the way is you. So keep an open mind, and build in time for the trumpet in your schedule. No book can offer you what is needed - that comes from within and ANY book can augment it.
     
  6. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Wise words - when it comes down to it, a good teacher can only show you the way. You are the one who is going to have to put in the work.
     
  7. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Let's not forget, Hichez is going to college. I am sure that there are trumpet lessoons available there.

    Let's also not forget that relationships are two way. The student has to open just like the teacher. For students that know everything and never had a decent teacher, maybe a mirror would be more suitable to get started!
     
  8. shooter

    shooter Piano User

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    Playing a trumpet is really not all that complicated. If you're having problems, then a teacher may come in handy.....If you're looking to sign a record deal, a teacher may come in handy.....But just doing something you love? Pop the mouthpiece in and enjoy yourself!
     
  9. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Define "decent teacher." Is it possible to extrapolate "lessons" of a sort from simply sitting or standing next to a really fine player for some rehearsals and gigs? A good musician is always looking in the mirror to find ways to improve and so humbly accepting tips and advice from those excellent players is part of it.
     
  10. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    let's also remember that a teacher does not know everything either - and a mirror is a good place for a teacher to improve also!!!!!!!
    I'm with trickg on this one -- the OP should keep playing and find other players to help with tips and growth in his trumpet playing. Books, other players, music, will benefit the OP greatly if he learns from all of these methods. (in my opinion, that is)
     

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