Self Study?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by trumpetseeker, Sep 23, 2012.

  1. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    ANYTHING is possible ...... There was a story (on here, I believe) about a guy in a very depressed and war torn part of Africa, who taught himself to read music, play the violin, conduct and compose symphonies. On his own, he gathered together other people around him, whom he taught to play various classical instruments. and started a symphony. They are now playing together, all of them having been taught by the guy who taught himself, and are gaining a good reputation.

    Yes, it's clearly possible to teach yourself trumpet to a very high level, but it's going to be a harder road. Anyone who says it can't be done is simply wrong. It has been done, by a few of the famous players we talk about in here.

    Even if you don't have a teacher, you probably aren't in a vacuum, and can get "instruction" on the fly from other musicians. This is how untold millions of guitar players learned how to play (most of the famous ones as well). No teachers, period. But, lots and lots of association with other musicians, who pass along chords, progressions, songs, etc.


    Turtle
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2012
  2. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    But just think of how much better this group could be doing today, had this individual had ADDITIONAL formal teaching. Then maybe I would have heard about his work.
     
  3. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    On the other hand, he could have had an autocratic, stuffed shirt teacher with a "My way or the highway" attitude (play this 7C or else!!! :evil::evil:) and we'd have never heard of him.
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2012
  4. Rapier

    Rapier Forte User

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    Why? There are dozens of orchestras around the UK that I have never heard of, and I'd guarantee you haven't.

    I do agree that having a teacher (especially early on) is the best option, IF possible.
     
  5. DiaxII

    DiaxII Pianissimo User

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    In addition to my "intelligent" blah-blah-blah earlier in the thread today I'd like to provide the OP with some pointers. Just a few. I'm actually in the same boat - teaching myself to play the trumpet and by the way I find it quite challenging, sometimes frustrating. So actually I was speaking from my experience and I would't recommend a person like myself to study the trumpet on your own but I don't know what king of person you are so you may have a different experience.
    Honestly though I had a year of private studies on saxophone and another year on clarinet before I started to study trumpet on my own but after two years with trumpet I'm not as near to my level of saxophone or clarinet playing but that's not because I don't have a teacher (I want to believe this :)).

    Anyway, you may want to check the following two channels on YouTube:
    1. Ten lessons or so from the 215th Army Band:
    215th Army Band - Massachussetts Army National Guard - YouTube

    Those are very good lessons for a starter.

    2. The channel and a free online pdf book by J.Harnum - he is quite good at explaining trumpet science:
    All About Trumpet: How to Play - YouTube
    http://www.allabouttrumpet.com/pdf/ST-PDF/SoundTheTrumpet-free.pdf

    There is much more free stuff on the web but you need something simple to get you started.
    Maybe get yourself the Rubank method for trumpet or a similar one.

    I actually often think about taking a few lessons from a professional myself because at the moment I'm stuck... :)
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2012
  6. Cornyandy

    Cornyandy Fortissimo User

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    I can't work your argument out your first post on this thread you seem to be pro self study but by this last quote you seem to contradict this.

    A proffesional would If he was worth his salt have seen why you were getting stuck and then corrected the problem before you got stuck.

    A case in point is one of my own pupils whose lip tends to curl in over his bottom lip when he is not playing. This could have become an issue because it began to happen as his range increased to the detriment of his sound. Had he been "self studying" he would probably have got stuck or found a compensation as he was begining to do over the course of a week or so. We devised between us a series of lip excercises to bring his bottom lip forward and "unrolled" before he started to play in a practice session. Week or so later at his next lesson, problem solved.

    The sticking point was spotted dealt with quickly and although because of his lip structure he knows he may always have to be aware of where what his bottom lip is doing it was sorted within a 14 day period

    I will point out that this pupil will do everything he is asked and then want more so I know how hard he works
     
  7. DiaxII

    DiaxII Pianissimo User

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    No, no contradiction. I was only speaking from my own experience. I have no intention of becoming a pro. That's not my goal but I pointed out that it's 'probably' possible.
    That was just a general advice applicable perhaps to many self-teaching areas.

    Actually the reason why you view my first and second posts as a contradiction is because I'm a contradictional person (I should admit it) but for me this is the norm but if you are a person who is always in agreement with yourself my posts may seem contradictional to you and I understand you because I laways understand such people like you (and I like their consistency) but you also try walking in my shoes (is that correct saying?). A little off-topic but I only wanted to explain your observation.

    I gave a warning that a person can self teach himself anything only if he is prepared to fail. I'm always prepared to fail because I know self-teaching trumpet is very difficult but I'm either brave, either stubborn (mind you, I can't call myself stupid) or I like to work towards unreachable goals. But that's me... I like to challenge myself but I always try to approach intelligently all my difficult goals with the best of my abilities. Sometimes it works, sometimes I'm stuck.

    Regarding your example above: I notice that I also curl my upper lip over the lower lip and that way I can still play a little higher. I have a 'teardrop upper lip' because at one time in the past I injured it. If I form an aperture I have a V on the lower lip and also a v on the upper lip.

    So I have this:
    v
    V

    Rather than this:
    ^
    V

    I know people with such a lip structure generally have difficulties playing trumpet but I don't give up... yet :)
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2012
  8. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Not necessarily. A prefessional has the option to turn to another, better yet a team [in music an ensemble] of other professionals. Individuals that advance fastest do so through team work.
     
  9. Cornyandy

    Cornyandy Fortissimo User

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    Agreed that a team can better but the point is you are not, in that situation, self studying either. You are still working with people who will spot problems


    TO DiaxII I hope you don't think I was "having a go"I just couldn't see where you were coming from.
    Nice use of "Walk a mile in my shoes" right expression pal
     
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2012
  10. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Disagree, I have learned just as much, or perhaps a bit more from my ensemble mates, giving me feedback, recommending additional techinques, ways of phrasing to fit the conversation of a group that I would NEVER have learned playing one on one with a singular teacher. Music is ALL about perfomance and feedback. The more feedback the better. Man I wish my medical colleagues could learn this from musician professionals. Someday, maybe someday!!!
     

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