Self-teaching resources?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Fortepiano, Jan 5, 2010.

  1. Jarrett

    Jarrett Piano User

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    Nov 11, 2003
    Richland, MO
    Yep, best lessons I've ever had were just rehearsals.

    As far as the DIY thing. I did this as well, and I'm STILL learning (aren't we all) and I'm STILL looking for a good teacher.

    As one of my former teachers used to say "You don't know what you don't know."

    A teacher does know what you don't know.

    :)
     
  2. Bixel

    Bixel Pianissimo User

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    Jan 1, 2010
    Germany
    Same with me... and listening to the masters and playing gigs, of course.

    I never regretted not having had a teacher.
    What I do regret is: there was no internet when I started playing trumpet.
    I wish I had had that bunch of information available!

    Even though music itself is a matter of relationship, the craftsmanship of trumpet playing has to (and can) be mastered by the player himself only.

    Depends on the teacher you find.
    Maybe you guys in the U.S. are on the sunny side.
    I know too many teacher in my area who either can't really play themselves or who teach BS or pretend their concept to be "the only one" or any combination of those three issues.

    That is why I support those who try it DIY.

    BTW: I teach trumpet.

    :lol:
    .
     
  3. simonstl

    simonstl Pianissimo User

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    Nov 25, 2008
    Dryden/Ithaca, NY
    I'm actually working on an essay addressing a lot of these issues. It's primarily about woodworking (building out of a review of a book on apprenticeships), but also getting into trumpet and computing. I'll let you know when I've posted it.

    For now, I'll just say the approach you suggest is not the only good path.

    I worry that you're stretching DIY to include the entire known universe of learning. The normal meaning of the term means not only "I do it" but "I do it independently."

    Just remember that not all players are seeking to be the finest players, casual or otherwise. Players can set their own goals, and not everyone aims for the sky. I don't.

    That's one place where woodworking seems to be more tolerant. I've seen woodworking communities welcome folks with questions about nailing together birdhouses with open arms, even if they don't aspire to fine furniture.
     
    Bixel likes this.
  4. dhbailey

    dhbailey Piano User

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    Jul 28, 2009
    New Hampshire
    Originally posted by Simon: Just remember that not all players are seeking to be the finest players, casual or otherwise.

    I would hope they are trying to be the finest players, within their own definition of what that means for them, that they can be. Just as with your statement about nailing birdhouses together, sure they may not be aiming at fine furniture, but I would hope they want to be the best birdhouse-nailer they can be or else they wouldn't be asking questions. I quite agree that not everybody wants to be the next Allen Vizzutti or Jon Faddis, and that is perfectly fine. But I would hope that anybody who picks up a trumpet wants to play well, even if they only want to play 3rd Cornet well.

    Bixel wrote: I know too many teacher in my area who either can't really play themselves or who teach BS or pretend their concept to be "the only one" or any combination of those three issues.

    While I agree that the latter two things (teaching BS or teaching that theirs is the only true way and all others are horrible) are things to avoid in any teacher, I don't agree that the teacher has to play well. What the teacher needs to do is to be able to facilitate and explain things to the student, to help the student to become better. A good teacher needs to be able to analyze problems, break them down into manageable bits to work on and to suggest exercises and practice routines which will enable the student to solve the problems and to continue to grow musically. Carmine Caruso was a saxophonist and a violinist, yet he is one of the finest trumpet teachers that ever lived, with countless top-name professionals going to him to seek advice to improve their trumpet playing.

    What a student needs to find out about a prospective new teacher is whether the teacher can offer insights and suggestions which will help the student, not whether the teacher is an artist-level player.

    In my opinion and experience.
     
  5. Bixel

    Bixel Pianissimo User

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    Jan 1, 2010
    Germany
    I see your point and I do agree. Difficult to handle though!

    I myself prefer teachers who are capable to demonstrate what they teach.
    Why would you trust a teacher's concept that obviously doesn't work with the teacher himself?
    I learned most from listening, watching and working with trumpet players miles ahead of myself.
    Even though a non-trumpet player may teach you some useable things (because e.g. she/he knows about body mechanics) I recommend to find a teacher who can really SHOW how it works.

    Takes nothing away from Carmine Caruso though.
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2010
  6. simonstl

    simonstl Pianissimo User

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    Nov 25, 2008
    Dryden/Ithaca, NY
    Expectations of "finest" aren't typically set by players, but by observers - here, not the people asking questions, but the people answering them. A lot of what I see as bad attitude here comes from people who take aiming for 3rd Cornet as a failure in itself.

    Because, of course, setting sights that low must be a sign of laziness, lack of talent, a poor upbringing, failure to listen to teachers, or perhaps too much time spent on Google.

    What you say sounds nice, but isn't how the conversation usually works - and I suspect that's why these conversations often feel nastily personal as well.
     
  7. Rushtucky

    Rushtucky Pianissimo User

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    Sep 15, 2008
    Indianapolis, Indiana
    Fortepiano - did you take notes? This thread contains a wealth of information and certainly will be of use to you. Teaching yourself the trumpet, it can be done, but the results will be less than positive. Anyone wanting to excel in anytype of endeavor needs the assistance of someone that is more knowledgeable than they are...a mentor if you wish.

    Ok, enough said. Let's go forward and see if we can develop a solution.

    First and foremost, practice the basics EVERY day. Long-tones (5 min. minimum), Slurs (5 min. minimum), Scales - I can not say enough here. Do ALL 12 major scales at least 4 times daily and know them by memory. Keep working the Arban's Method book.

    Second, find a group to play with other than your HS band. By playing with others you will develop how to interact with others and work on sight reading, rythm and other fundamentals.

    Third, you are not going to like this, but you need to find a teacher that you can work with. Band director...not a good idea. Go to music stores and ask around. There are excellent teachers out there just waiting to assist you. You need a teacher/mentor to assist you.

    Now that we have that established, let's address your question regarding finding online assistance.

    First, I would like you to check out and possible join the International Trumpet Guild:
    International Trumpet Guild Home Page
    This site is a wealth of information and has a great section for students. The fee for a Student is only $30 per year. You will get access to the online website, a quarterly journal that is full of information and network with other student trumpet players.

    Second, check out Smart Music. This is an online source for assisting a student in learning to play an instrument. Even though it has a section for the Home Student, it is NOT a substitute for a teacher. This site is also recommended by the International Trumpet Guild. Once again, a bargain for the resources that are offered - $30.00 per year (plus you get a discount if you are a member of ITG).
    Check out Smart Music online: SmartMusic

    However, there is no substitute for practicing EVERY day and a teacher/mentor.

    In conclusion, I have been playing for over 25 years and still have a teacher/mentor that I use to keep me on track. Bad habits are too easy to develop and one needs some to catch these before they expand and effect your playing.
     
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  8. Carroll W. Schroeder

    Carroll W. Schroeder Pianissimo User

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    Nov 3, 2009
    McMinnville, Oregon
    Can't stress enouph at this time in your life to find a the best teacher you can possiably afford. Your young and do not have the baggage or attachments a older person would have. Begg borrow and then some to get the teacher. The horn will come. There is so much to learn, and you can't do it alone, that is if you want to be a pro one day,if not continue the way your going. All the best. Carroll
     
  9. simonstl

    simonstl Pianissimo User

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    Nov 25, 2008
    Dryden/Ithaca, NY
    Didn't he make it clear already that he didn't want to be a pro?

    Funny how I just wrote about the expectations people on this site project...
     
  10. Bixel

    Bixel Pianissimo User

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    Jan 1, 2010
    Germany
    There are a few self-taught pros though.

    Are there any statistics about what percentage of people having taken trumpet lessons turned pro one day?
    Like 5%? Or less?

    So better not tell beginners or intermediates that lessons definitely exceed by much their pro career chance by taking regular lessons.
    Makes no sense, for my money.

    Making music is for having a good time in the first place.
    If you can make a living out of that one day - great, and lucky you (no matter how you got there).

    :roll:
    .
     

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