Shattering a Wine Glass with the Sound of a Trumpet!

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by NickD, Dec 11, 2007.

  1. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Nick,
    you played with Maynard, then you could probably break beer or champagne bottles too! ;-)

    Great experiment! Assuming that your microphone did a good job of reproducing your sound, you weren't even playing FFF.
     
  2. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Could this work on wood, too? Like, say, a viola?
     
  3. brem

    brem Mezzo Forte User

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    Why not?
     
  4. Richard Oliver

    Richard Oliver Forte User

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    Nick, your the next Professor Irwin Corey!!

    :)

    Naww, that's the other guy. Who remembers, Professor Julius Sumner Miller. That's the fellow who taught physics on tv when I was a nipper.
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2007
  5. NickD

    NickD Forte User

    Actually, shattering a viola, even though it might bring satisfaction to many trumpeters, wouldn't be that easy to do. The glass had a rather hi-Q and it's predominant resonance was that rather flat G. I think it did have some harmonics, but they did not seem to be getting energized to any extent. Violas are designed to ampliy a lot of diffent notes, and this means a low overall Q. so for me to pick one note with which to whack a viola I'd have to play incredibly loud to cause the motion at the antinodes to be large enough shatter the wood, though it is theoretically possible.

    I think I could do it if I drove the viola directly with a good size speaker and picked a nice loud note right in the middle of the range and then ran the volume way up.

    In this case, I think I'd just shatter the viola by whacking it with the trumpet. My Cali light is a very tough axe, and I donb't the the viola would even make a dent in it!

    ;-)

    Nick

    PS: I'm just kidding about the violence to violas. Some of my best friends play viola! :-)
     
  6. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Ouch!
     
  7. Mikey

    Mikey Forte User

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    Ah, Nick. Good to see you get along with Lesbians, too....

    ;-)
     
  8. tatakata

    tatakata Mezzo Forte User

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    :lol:

     
  9. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Nick,
    I think the low overall Q applies to certain players too. My physics training says that low Q means low resonance...............

    Destroying the viola would probably be easier by getting the strings (they are tuned thus of higher Q) to vibrate so violently that they rip the instrument apart. You would probably need 4 tones generated (without vibrato of course) at the same time (the viola has 4 strings) to accomplish this!
    This is probably more work than it is worth, considering that you don't often hear the viola anyway!
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2007
  10. NickD

    NickD Forte User

    Q is center frequency divided by bandwidth, so I've interpreted it to mean "slotting." Yes the strings are high Q as they have sharp slots at the fundamental of each strign and then the harmoincs. However the body of the viola needs to respond well to as many frequencies as possible, and this implies a wide bandwidth, to me. I agree with your whole string assmesment as the means by which to destroy a viola in a creative fashion.

    Ok, ok, "I KEED, I KEED..." I don't REALLY have anythig against viola! Really!

    :-)

    Nick
     

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