shortened mouthpiece next effect

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by andrew_cz, Jun 25, 2015.

  1. andrew_cz

    andrew_cz New Friend

    39
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    Oct 20, 2010
    Czech Republic
    Hello,

    I just find mouthpiece that my father played. Its Bach 3C corporation. Iam actually playing Bach 1 1/2C and i want to try smaller so i decide to try it.

    There is one problem - he shorten the mouthpice (around 5mm) because he wants to fit it on flugelhorn. Is there some next effect like tone quality/tunning or something that i can be afraid of?

    Thanks for tips!

     
  2. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Things will be affected, but sometimes for the better. Perhaps, if you know someone with an un-shortened 3C, you can compare how the two mouthpieces play and feel.
     
  3. tpsiebs

    tpsiebs Piano User

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    Feb 6, 2010
    Randolph, New Jersey
    I was given a Stork LX-10 StudioMaster short shank and later the same dude gave me the standard shank as well. There are performance differences as the size of the gap is reduced on the standard shank. They are similar to Schilke 13a4a but with a much more comfortable rim. Pretty decent commercial sound.I don't really like either of them. I'll them as a "cheaters" (cant' play them all the time because they are so bright): I can tell you that they definitely give you different performance and different feedback.
     
  4. Tomaso

    Tomaso Pianissimo User

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    Your ear should tell you if you're out of tune.
     
  5. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    One way of testing mouthpieces is to play several long notes and "play natural," allowing the pitch to rise or fall during the crescendo. If the mouthpiece matches the horn, the pitch will stay neutral. If the pitch drops, the backbore is too small. If the pitch rises, the backbore is too large. One way of making the backbore smaller is by shortening the shank by filing it down. Once the proper length is achieved, the outer shank needs to be turned down so the end of the shank matches the original size.
     
  6. andrew_cz

    andrew_cz New Friend

    39
    1
    Oct 20, 2010
    Czech Republic
    Thank you guys for tips!

    I can say - when i test it, i didnt recognize the change, maybe i was a bit higher, but really a bit.

    I was using 1 1/2 my whole life and i need to change it to smaller because i cant finish etudes and concerts that i play at school. I hope it helps me.
     
  7. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    My experience has been that players moving to a smaller mouthpiece are wild about the extra range, power and endurance until their chops adjust, and then they are back where they started. Your endurance problems may well have more to do with overall tension than mouthpiece size.
     

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