Should I Relacquer my Horn?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by datrieuth, Dec 20, 2011.

  1. codyb226

    codyb226 Banned

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    No, you didnt. Go to a home improvement store or online and get Aircraft Paint Remover and the softest steel wool you can find. You will spray the remover on the trumpet and leave it for about 3 minutes then GENTLY rub off the lacquer with the wool. Works great, I would do it to my horn if I wanted raw brass. This is a serious reply, not joking.
     
  2. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Intonation is rarely a finish issue (I would say never really). This is the 1st time I've heard someone blame the finish!! ROFL Slides are long for a reason. An inch, 2, it doesn't matter, just as long as your in tune.
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Here is my standard link for sharp players.

    David G. Monette Corporation

    Don't bother looking at the horns. The body use stuff is what is significant here.

    I think that it is also irresponsible to bring mouthpieces into this discussion. That would infer that a mouthpiece could solve this issue. I see no possibility.

    Always start at the bottom when analysing a problem. The bottom is not hardware.
     
  4. Sterling

    Sterling Mezzo Forte User

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    I usually play a Bach 43 Sterling bell or a Conn 48B vocabell. Two weeks ago I found a Conn Director Coprion Bell trumpet in a pawn shop for $130.00. I have had a devil of a time playing third space C in tune (really sharp) until I remembered the Monette techniques that Rouwk referenced.
     
  5. codyb226

    codyb226 Banned

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    That Monette technique really does work. I wouldnt look at the horns if I were you, just to avoid a lot of things.
     
  6. glorybe

    glorybe Piano User

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    Brass lives with a good coating. Without a good coating brass has a shorter life. And that coating is not making you play sharp either.
    I have been all around on this issue and get heat because of it but make note. The first plastic trombone is now on sale for $150.. It sounds like a trombone pure and simple. Now i wanted that to be for trumpets and cornets. Yes the valves would still be metal and that is all that is needed. And it would be better to use a more expensive plastic as well. Laminated Kevlar is one tough material that should work. Forget dents. It is next to impossible to cut it with a band saw. High tech plastics are more than suited for any level of horn building. Now if cheap plastic sounds pretty good how could a thin coat of lacquer possibly ruin the sound of a horn? This is very similar to the battle in the 1950 era over quality clarinets being made of synthetics. They worked just fine even 60 years ago. What we do have are factories and builders who have skills in working brass and the machines and tools to produce and they are resisting change. The only real benefit of brass or silver in horns is that both materials tend to kill bacteria. More sanitation is called for if other materials are used. So we now have carbon fiber cellos and double basses and plastic clarinets and trombones. The first, good quality, trumpets made from synthetics will be a block buster and a huge block buster if prices are kept low.
     
  7. datrieuth

    datrieuth New Friend

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    OK! Thanks Guys! Uhmmmm I think that's all the insight i need! I appreciate all the help! What am I gonna do? I have no idea!!!!! ROFL Im probably gonna talk to the instrument dealer to see what's what. Find out more about the horn. See what their professional opinion is on the matter. Things like that!
     
  8. BrassEye

    BrassEye Pianissimo User

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    Rowuk, if the comment about irresponsibility was aimed at me, I disagree. However, I maybe wasn't clear enough in what I was saying.

    I play on middle of the road equipment. I have one mouthpiece that's ridiculously shallow, and tight. On that mouthpiece, and that mouthpiece alone (out of the small number I own) I play incredibly sharp. So much so that I don't use it. It is an extreme mouthpiece, more so than the 14A4a, for instance.

    My only reason for mentioning the mouthpiece was that if the OP is playing on something extreme, trying a mouthpiece more in the middle ground may show a reduction in the issue. I was not suggesting a full on mouthpiece safari and I actually think it's far more likely to be body use; I once had a similar issue and mine was caused by excessive tension.

    The Monette link is excellent and something that we would all benefit from re-reading every once in a while.
     
  9. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    BrassEye,

    I prefer to address the obvious problems. Mouthpieces are not one of them. I can switch between a 1C and a 14A4A (10 1/2E,.....) and my pitch does not change (actually, this also applies to all of my students), only the color of the sound does. If you play sharp, then the problem is YOU not the dead hunk of brass. It is possible that a particular mouthpiece will demonstrate YOUR true colors, the fault lays with flesh and blood. Changing a mouthpiece needs MONTHS to settle down. It is useless here.

    There is no need to bring the mouthpiece into the discussion until the body use issues are at least well on their way. Treating symptoms does not help a trumpet player.
     

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