should lips touch

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by songbook, Jan 20, 2013.

  1. Conntribution

    Conntribution Fortissimo User

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    Les Noces de Pierrette, of course!
     
  2. acarcido

    acarcido Forte User

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    When your lips are on the mouthpiece, you adjust your emboucher so that you create a seal at the corners and focus your air flow center mass to the mouthpiece. The air flow combination of presssure and lip fluctuation create a buzzing sound in the mouthpiece alone, or a generate a tone when the mouthpiece is inserted into the trumpets mouthpiece reciever. The player will never know that the tone being created in the trumpet is the standing wave that is bounced back into the mouthpiece after it has traveled the full length of the trumpet. This standing wave is also know as the resonant frequency. The player might say, this horn has a great feedback or it has a good vibrant feel to it. This is the physics of the horn and everything in the horns design accounts for its sanding wave. Jason Harrelson is an expert in this field and thrives on his designs manipulating the physical charachteristics of the trumpet to achieve what his horns are designed to do.

    So if you want physics, lets just simply say that as air passes through your upper and lower lip. The air will fluctuate within the mouthpiece creating a frequency/tone/buzz that will propogate through the trumpet and bounce back to the source (aka your lip fluctuating) and at that point, creates a tone.

    Try playing a Tuba and notice how long it takes to react to this standing wave. I could go on and on being that I love mathematical equations, but thats for the nerdy forums.
     
  3. Conntribution

    Conntribution Fortissimo User

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    When my lips are open, I cannot produce a sound. When they are closed I can.
     
  4. Phil986

    Phil986 Forte User

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    "should lips touch "
    According to the ladies, that's a resounding yes...
     
  5. ultratrumpet

    ultratrumpet Piano User

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    "When your lips are together, you have a prayer. If your lips are apart, you'll get nothing but air."

    William B. Knevitt
     
  6. songbook

    songbook Piano User

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  7. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Songbook, yes, you did read it, as follows, "By opening up the lips so that they do not touch, the larger mouthpiece produces a clearer, purer tone." Then it follows, with "The large cup diameter also allows a greater portion of the lip to vibrate, producing a larger volume of tone, and keeps a player from forcing high tones by encouraging the correct functioning of the lip muscles."

    However, this is marketing media not different than the snake oil hype of the "quack Doctor" of yesteryear who marketed his "cure all for all ills and ailments".

    The only quotation of Vincent Bach's is on the page ahead of what you read, "Choosing the perfect mouthpiece is often more difficult than choosing the perfect instument." This I will resoundingly agree with.

    Which, by the way, are you using any one of the "Large" mouthpieces that apply to what you've read, and seemingly taken out of context?
     
  8. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    The only time I've heard a one finger snap is when it breaks and then it's quite painful.
     
  9. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Songbook, yes, you did read it, as follows, "By opening up the lips so that they do not touch, the larger mouthpiece produces a clearer, purer tone." Then it follows, with "The large cup diameter also allows a greater portion of the lip to vibrate, producing a larger volume of tone, and keeps a player from forcing high tones by encouraging the correct functioning of the lip muscles."

    However, this is marketing media not different than the snake oil hype of the "quack Doctor" of yesteryear who marketed his "cure all for all ills and ailments".

    The only quotation of Vincent Bach's is on the page ahead of what you read, "Choosing the perfect mouthpiece is often more difficult than choosing the perfect instument." This I will resoundingly agree with.

    Which, by the way, are you using any one of the "Large" mouthpieces that apply to what you've read, and seeming taken out of context?
     
  10. JNINWI

    JNINWI Piano User

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    Roger Ingram has made the statement many times that lips do not touch when playing, but rather vibrate independently of each other which creates your sound.
     

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