Should we always take the easy option?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Sethoflagos, Jan 15, 2014.

  1. Rapier

    Rapier Forte User

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    So, practice climbing a sand dune in big wellies, and carry a fridge on your back just to make it tough.

    You may have a Wild Thing, but you cant play it for very long because you are weak and worthless. ROFL
     
  2. Comeback

    Comeback Forte User

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    Useful discussion, Seth. I frequently get lost in the technological weeds with my trumpeting and lose what little grip I have on artistry; probably a consequence of my education and career experience, where I spend/spent lots of time analyzing and solving technical problems. My Mrs. and what I assimilate from the forums is helpful in correcting my focus.

    You are probably familiar with "lean manufacturing" concepts where special attention is paid to making sure all resources (human and other) are directed toward producing consistently high quality products in a timely, reliable, and profitable manner. Maybe this idea can be helpful to those of us steeped in technology. What sort of music do we want to produce, and in what sort of environment? What gear is sufficient to help us produce it? Most importantly, what do we have to do personally to produce it? Once the production equipment (horn/mouthpiece) is adequate, shouldn't we concentrate on optimal use of the raw material (what we bring to the horn)?

    Given that most non-trumpeting listeners couldn't care less if we play a student trumpet or a Monette, once our gear is sufficient for producing our music, maybe we should just forget obsessing over gear and focus on using it well.

    This post may miss addressing your concerns entirely, but maybe there is a little here that you might find helpful.

    Jim
     
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  3. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    Well, a trumpet needs to sound like a trumpet, so I don't generally use large diameter or really deep trumpet mouthpieces. I'm a 3C player on trumpet, and never was too happy with the sound I produced on a Bach 3C. I switched to a Curry 3C. and the endurance is still there, but the tone is more to my liking, with more body, or richness, to the sound. To me, it has more of the sound of a 1-1/2C without the added effort to play it.
     
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  4. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Here's a link to John Stork's library. I think it's a good read.
    Lu en franais*** Gelesen auf Deutsch******* Ledo en espaol
    Why the link is in French, German, and Spanish I don't know, but it works.
     
  5. bumblebee

    bumblebee Fortissimo User

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    That's pretty interesting -- I notice distinct differences between the sound I make with otherwise comparable mouthpieces, and have noticed some differences in endurance too. Perhaps the endurance aspect is due to unconsciously trying to compensate for something all the while I'm playing one mouthpiece which I might not need to so much on the other? A bit like driving your car with the tracking a little out, wearing away your tyres.

    --bumblebee
     
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  6. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    Just to clarify - this thread is not about "What's the best size of mouthpiece?". We've done that many, many times.

    I have a sound concept, or rather a sound concept spectrum, I wish to develop. It just so happens that I find it easier to realise (at least mid-range) on the DW 2W, a moderately large, moderately deep piece. But I need to work on many aspects of my play, not least my endurance, in order to get there.

    The question is, do I get to where I want to be via the easy, scenic route (ie regain the endurance I recently lost via an 'easy' 3C stage) or climb the mountain the direct route and just go for it, even if it reduces my effective practice time down to 30-45 minutes a day?
     
  7. Comeback

    Comeback Forte User

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    I'm thinking it is time to climb the mountain, Seth. You know what it takes to obtain your sound concept. I suggest you practice that, maybe a couple briefer times a day separated by rest periods if possible. Persist and note your practice time capacity increasing. My go-to combo lately has been the Eterna Classic and Curry 3C. (the 3C. represented acceptance of Dale's suggestion to me some time ago). I am sticking with it and getting my sound. The combo is comfortable and my use of it is improving. I wish for you the same sort of experience with your most favorable combination.

    Jim
     
  8. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    I would practice on what you're going to play. If you want to develop endurance, use a large bore trumpet! :roll:
     
  9. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    It really boils down to what sound you want to produce. There are tradeoffs (especially when picking mouthpieces) involving ease of play vs. richness if tone. Generally, the richness comes easier on large mouthpieces at the expense of endurance and range. The way to overcome those shortcomings is a lot of the right kinds of practice and then a lot of maintenance to maintain those chops. For those of us who don't have the time or inclination to go that route, smaller/different mouthpieces are a way to help out.

    Smaller diameters with deeper cups work for some, and I can do pretty well on cornet using something deep and open like a Wick 4B or Curry 3BBC. That didn't come without a lot of practice on those mouthpieces, though, and they aren't the largest BBB-style mouthpieces available, by far. They are still a compromise in tone/playability, but they get the job done.

    Some people just naturally have a richer tone than others, and have an easier time of it if that's the sound they want. Sometimes, it's easier to start out with a "dark" sounding horn and brighten it to your ideal sound concept by using a mouthpiece with smaller specs. That's assuming you can play on smaller mouthpieces - it can also be difficult to play on one thats shallow or tight, so that's another issue that may or may not be solved by more practice on a particular mouthpiece.

    That said, if the only way to get the sound concept you want is via larger mouthpieces, then you need to dive in and get to work. All large mouthpieces aren't the same, either, so you may find something with better ease of play that still allows you to produce the sound you want. That's what switching from a Bach 3C to a Bach 1-1/2C to a Curry 3C. did for me.
     
  10. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    All very good stuff Dale. It has crossed my mind to have GR make me up something on a 2 rim with maybe a double cup for the depth without quite so much cup volume. Maybe a slightly tighter backbore too, but that's way down the line for me. Let's see how far I get with what I have first.
     

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