Should we have moist lips on the mouthpiece?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Terrizzi, Oct 29, 2011.

  1. Terrizzi

    Terrizzi New Friend

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    Oct 18, 2010
    Jacksonville FL
    I have always played with dry lips? Why should they be moist? Does anyone use dry?

    Seems like you see everyone who is good wetting the lips....Wynton, etc...
     
  2. LukeDempsey1995

    LukeDempsey1995 New Friend

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    Oct 18, 2011
    I personally wet the lips... It means they dont stick to the mouthpiece, and therefore I have more flexibility on my embouchure...
    But everyone has their own ways of doing things...
    I also seem to get a better buzz with moist lips, and therefore a nicer sound
     
  3. AKtrumpet

    AKtrumpet Piano User

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    Some do some don't. There is no strict formula to successful trumpet playing.
     
  4. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    I play with moist lips, but some of my students play with dry lips. As long as you are getting good results, it really doesn't matter.
     
  5. s.coomer

    s.coomer Forte User

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    Play which ever way you feel comfortable. Lot's of other things to worry about.
     
  6. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    I just don't seem to be consistent when my lips become dry and my ability to vibrate them weakens. Then all it takes is a quick swish of my tongue and I'm good to go for quite awhile.
     
  7. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    They should be moist. They are a port of a mucosal membrane. Then need to be moistened. That is one of the functions of the tongue. Along with mastication of food, tasting salt, sweat, bitter, sour, the other important function of the tongue is to moisten the lips. You probably don't know you're even doing it, being this is such a common habitual routine.
     
  8. Kujo20

    Kujo20 Forte User

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    It just depends on the person. I play dry. However...almost every trumpet player I know (personally) wets their lips before playing. Maybe I'm just the odd one out? :dontknow:

    Kujo
     
  9. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Before we continue this conversation, can we define dry? I mean most of us do not play when we are 3% dehydrated, which the medical point that we consider patients as being try. Lip tissue is minimally affected below this threshold. So again, what do posters mean by dry? I will start the definition phase in my next post.
     
  10. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    For me, playing dry means playing my horn without the benefit of first drinking a gin and tonic.
     

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