Sidewinders...or Rotary Trumpets if you perfer

Discussion in 'Horns' started by WAKeele, Oct 11, 2004.

Do you play an American type mouthpiece on rotary or a more traditional German/Austrian type???

  1. American

    100.0%
  2. German/Austrian Mouthpiece

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  1. WAKeele

    WAKeele Pianissimo User

    66
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    Sep 30, 2004
    The Wild West
    I just recently acquired my second rotary and want to get serious about how to properly play a rotary. I've been doing a decent amount of reading since I first started looking for my first horn and would like to hear from some guys that play them regularly, particularly European players.

    I'm going to stick with my Yamaha 15E4 until I have the money again to play around. I'm trying to stick with a traditional style mouthpiece because I don't want to sound like an American trying to play Germanic horn. I just don't like how I sound playing my normal mouthpiece and have tried different combinations without any luck.

    What were you Europeans told from your teachers when you first started on sidewinders? Stuff like that, you know.

    My goal on the rotary is to be able to audition for a German orchestra and them not say, "oh, this guy's an American".

    Thanks!
     
  2. WAKeele

    WAKeele Pianissimo User

    66
    2
    Sep 30, 2004
    The Wild West
    Well I'm giving up on this and just going to play the sucker way I think it should be played. :?
     
  3. MUSICandCHARACTER

    MUSICandCHARACTER Forte User

    1,140
    2
    Jan 31, 2004
    Newburgh, Indiana
    I can't believe that someone here hasn't had to play one. Surely we have a few European trumpeters on this board; If not, it is kind of amazing.
     
  4. WAKeele

    WAKeele Pianissimo User

    66
    2
    Sep 30, 2004
    The Wild West
    humm... :-?
     
  5. Heavens2kadonka

    Heavens2kadonka Forte User

    Age:
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    Jun 17, 2004
    Lebanon, TN
    Y know, of all the musical instruments I have seen, from this weird Irish drum to a turtle shell banjo, I have never seen a rotary trumpet in my life, nor do I think I have ever been within 100 miles of one...

    I don't think I have ever heard anyone even describe to me how they sound/feel compared to piston trumpets... :shock:

    Van
     
  6. Jeroen Jongeling

    Jeroen Jongeling Pianissimo User

    57
    0
    Nov 10, 2003
    Amsterdam!!!
    Take a look on the site www.breslmair.at . They are one of the leading mouthpiece manufacturers for rotary trumpets. Most players I know prefer the Breslmair mouthpiece on their rotary trumpet. The majority of top orchestral players, that play rotary as main horn (Germany, Austria), play with the Breslmair mouthpieces.

    I play on a Lechner C rotary (not my main horn, that's a piston trumpet, thank god :-P ). Currently I'm playing the Götterdämmerung here in Amsterdam, so it's rotary time. I started out with the Yamaha 16E4, which I really liked. Very friendly rim, intonation with the Lechner is very good and the sound is very warm. The Yamaha pieces really suprised me, as I was avoiding them my whole life (due to the "Japanese? Can't be good" - attitude). So, the Yamaha pieces are a good option, I think.

    I switched to an old Bach special piece, because I needed more clarity in my attacks, esspecially in soft passages. It's an old 1C rim, with a B-cup, 25 throat and S backbore (symphonic, 24?). That rim gives me a bit more assistance in the soft attacks. The overall sound is a bit brighter, but still dark enough.

    I'm thinking of ordering a Breslmair piece when I've finished this production. The Rheingold is coming up in april, so more rotary action to come. Hope my post helps you a bit in choosing a good piece.

    Jeroen.
     
  7. Heavens2kadonka

    Heavens2kadonka Forte User

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    Boo-yah! :cool:

    Van
     
  8. Jeroen Jongeling

    Jeroen Jongeling Pianissimo User

    57
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    Nov 10, 2003
    Amsterdam!!!
    Regarding the difference between American and European players? You can almost always tell where somebody learned to play trumpet. It doesn't matter what trumpet you play, nor what mouthpiece you have on it. It's all about your style of playing, your sound, the way you approach the music, etc. In other words: your cultural background and environment.
     
  9. WAKeele

    WAKeele Pianissimo User

    66
    2
    Sep 30, 2004
    The Wild West
    Thanks Mr. Jongeling for your imput! It's nice hearing a European's take on rotaries. I guess to get the best idea on how to play like a German or Austrian is to study with one and listen to them live. Maybe I'll try to spend some time in Germany or Austria after I leave Chicago. Thanks again!
     
  10. Heavens2kadonka

    Heavens2kadonka Forte User

    Age:
    31
    1,329
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    Jun 17, 2004
    Lebanon, TN
    Lord, I would LOOOVE to study abroad sometime. Thats what I'm practicing toward: Getting a chance to study with the greats across the ocean, and taking from their sound.....

    Van
     

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