Silly Surgeon!!! Well, maybe overly concerned is more accurate.

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by amzi, May 1, 2014.

  1. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    I was tutoring a high school freshman who has just undergone a gastric by-pass to address his extreme obesity. He's also on a stronger dosage of injectable insulin for his diabetes. He's home from the hospital with direction to rest in bed and avoid all stress for 6 weeks including not to play his trumpet. About 10:00 AM a Public Health Nurse visits, and a academic tutor comes at 4:00 PM. If and when he returns to playing trumpet, surely it will be a set-back. The only reason he is not in the high school marching band is that they have no uniform big enough to fit him but I did get him in the high school concert band as he has his own custom made black suit. I suppose he'll have to get it altered over the summer or get a new one.
     
  2. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    While abdominal contents do compress on the surgical site, there is no air swallowed that will effect intra-stomach pressure at the surgical site. This should only require a couple weeks to heal, much as is recommend with Gall Bladder surgery. As long as air is not swallowed which this article suggest that it is not: http://www.legacyweb.rcm.ac.uk/cache/fl0019990.pdf Then I think it is OK to practice once the surgical scar healing is at a good point in two weeks.
     
  3. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    I don't know Doctors -- I feel for AMZI and his doctor's advice. (I always tell my Mom, ((since she doesn't do as the doctor prescribes most of the time)) -- "Mom, why do you go to the Doctor if your not going to listen to her??)) --- so advice over the internet, although nice, it might be a good idea for the OP to get a second opinion from another doctor that can examine him.

    on a side note, as far as ingesting too much air when playing the trumpet, or other side effects: My stomach often feels like it's muscles just got a workout when I play the trumpet, so I think it is working better than abdominal crunches and such for my body ------ however, my stomach does seem to breathe in air, as the resultant sounds from the trumpet playing indicate that my posterior portions are exhaling the extra ingested air, of course, I never figured out how the alveoli in my stomach and corresponding bronchial passageways are not infiltrated with food particles, albeit, the exhaling of my stomach does produce a funny smelling aroma in the air. ROFL ROFL ROFL
     
  4. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    If you have alveoli in you stomach KT, then you are in big trouble my friend!
     
  5. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    but that seems to be the only logical explanation of how my stomach can breath!!!! ROFL ROFL ROFL and that does explain the "bad breath" that eminates from the posterior portion of my body when I play the trumpet. "food particles getting caught in the alveoli ROFL ROFL ROFL
     
  6. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    As I said, I agree with John, Gary, and others here that 6 months seems to be too long. And if you're looking for the hard evidence behind a medical issue, Gary is definitely the man to find it.

    But as doctors we are sometimes "paid to worry". I'm sure John and his doctor will figure out the right time to wait, and to work back into playing. And of course, best of luck with the surgery and hope for a speedy recovery.

    Mike
     
  7. amzi

    amzi Forte User

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    Once again, thanks for everyone's input. Part of the problem with my surgeon and his partner is that they have zero experience playing a wind instrument. The closest I've come is a nurse in his office who played clarinet and her brother played trumpet. She thought there wouldn't be any problem at all--as long as it doesn't cause discomfort of pain go ahead. But she has never had bariatric surgery. Of course, as a professional she immediately deferred to the surgeon and told me to ask him. Anyway, the office is studying the issue so hopefully I will receive a reasonable directive. I really don't want to defy a doctor's orders, but then again--he's reaching a conclusion based upon caution rather than any sort of empirical information. This is worse than a mouthpiece safari.
     
  8. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    Well perhaps your doctor will call Gary up and talk over the "recovery" period with him - I find it hard to fathom that no one played a trumpet in your doctors office. What was he a piano player?
     
  9. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    Sometimes when we post online (when I post online), our replies (my replies) can seem more black-and-white than they are intended to be. Of course, noone is looking to defy their doctor's orders. And of course, John is doing all the right things. I didn't mean to imply otherwise.

    Kingtrumpet makes a good suggestion.
     
  10. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    My tutoring trumpet student seems to be doing well following his recent Roux En Y bariatric surgery, where his Doc said not to play for 6 weeks ... and he can't because I've now both his trumpets to have them serviced. His Grandma called this morning to tell me he had been given appointment to see the Doc again in 6 weeks. Thus, his "time out" may then be extended. Truly, I personally thought 6 weeks was early, considering his extreme obesity. I'm just Praying he can, and will want to, resume when school starts again in late August.

    With an academic tutor and doing his studies well, he's is certain to pass become a sophomore. The Public Health nurse that visits him now every other day is Bariatric Certified.
     

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