silver plated mouthpiece cleaning/polishing

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Blind Bruce, Nov 15, 2009.

  1. Blind Bruce

    Blind Bruce Pianissimo User

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    My Olds 3 MP was black when I received it. I used "silvo" on it and it looks good as new. However, is it sanitary to use it as is , or is there a need to remove the Silvo before playing. I washed it in warm soapy water. Is that enough?
    Anything else I should know?
     
  2. RB-R37297

    RB-R37297 Pianissimo User

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    Mar 12, 2009
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    I just use toothpaste on my Bach 3C, it seems to work just fine. Not sure about Silvo though.
     
  3. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    Silvo is just pumice in white spirit - warm soapy water and a good rinse should be fine. Toothpaste is my choice though because it leaves such a nice minty flavour.

    BTW, my wife bought some toothpaste in a $2 Shop the other day (we had run out and it was convenient) and when we went to use the stuff, it tasted like Metsal (a topical linament) - yep we used salt instead and chucked out the so-called toothpaste. I didn't try it on a MP though - would have tasted ugly, but.
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2009
  4. Ric232

    Ric232 Pianissimo User

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    Don't use any kind of silver polish or tarnish remover on any part of the mouthpiece that is even remotely close to touching your lips. I made the mistake of doing that with 3M Tarnishield. The mouthpiece came out nice and shiny, but it left the rim and cup very sticky. Even with the mpc wet, I could not adjust my embouchure. Fortunately, cleaning it a couple of times with toothpaste helped, but I still don't think it was the same. I've since changed mpc's so it doesn't matter.
     
  5. dhbailey

    dhbailey Piano User

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    Jul 28, 2009
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    I use silver polish all the time and never have run into what Ric is describing.

    In repair school I was told that Hagerty's Silversmith Polish was the best, and that's all I ever use for mouthpieces -- put it on and then immediately polish it off and wash it off with warm soapy water and you'll be all set.
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Wrap the mouthpiece with aluminum foil and put it in a pot of HOT (but not boiling) salt water.
    The sulphur from the silver sulphide (tarnish) moves to the aluminum and the mouthpiece is silver again with NO ABRASIVES. All of the silver stays put. A MUCH better solution!
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2009
  7. DiaxII

    DiaxII Pianissimo User

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    I used what is described above on my Conn 4 MP recently that came with a 60-s Conn Director. I added two teaspoons of baking soda and two teaspoons of salt to approx 2 liters of moderately boiling water in the glass pan lined with aluminum cooking foil.
    It took more than 20 minutes for the slightly blackened MP to return to alsmost white silver color. ALMOST but not completely. I additionally had to work on it with DELU silver tarnish remover. It contains no acids. After application of DELU the MP returned to its original bright silver state.
     
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I use much more salt and no polish afterwards
     
  9. Blind Bruce

    Blind Bruce Pianissimo User

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    Well, which is it, sodium carbonate or salt? I am no chemist, are they the same thing?
     
  10. veery715

    veery715 Utimate User

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    It doesn't matter if you use salt, baking soda, washing soda - as long as it is a sodium salt which dissociates in water. Almost all sodium salts will allow this. The sodium ion (Na+) transports sulfur, which bonds with silver as tarnish, from the silver to the aluminum.

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