Since you asked...

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Manny Laureano, Jun 13, 2005.

  1. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

    5,915
    10
    Sep 29, 2004
    USA
  2. Bear

    Bear Forte User

    1,255
    4
    Apr 30, 2004
    USA
    haha! Showoff... just kidding. You are one bad mofo Mr. L. Anytime you wanna give this poor lil kid some pointers on the classical side of things, lemme have it, lol. Go Tech!! Peace.

    Tim
     
  3. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

    6,793
    3,560
    Oct 26, 2003
    Baltimore/DC
    I like it. I really liked the fact that I really couldn't tell from looking at either one of you which one was playing which part - that sounded really full, robust and effortless - almost like you could cut the sound with a knife.

    How did you guys mic it? Is it only the mic on the camera? There is quite a bit of echo too. Is the ceiling on that room high and was there a lot of natural echo in the room?

    Something that I thought was interesting was David's alternate fingering. Did he use the 3rd valve to play an E? If so, why? Is it a sound/blend thing or intonation thing?

    I thought it sounded great. I want to hear and see more!
     
  4. FlugelFlyer

    FlugelFlyer Piano User

    311
    1
    Dec 15, 2003
    Palos Park, IL
    Too bad my computer sucks, but what I managed to squeeze out of the 2 kilos of useable RAM sounded excellent!
     
  5. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

    5,915
    10
    Sep 29, 2004
    USA
    Patrick,

    It was done just with the mic on the camera and Dave has always expressed a prefernce for using the 3rd valve on the high A's whenever practical. He noticed that Bud always played the high A with the 3rd valve and built the horns with that in mind. I generally just trigger it but when I have a sustained A to play I like the third valve also. It's just a bit of laziness on my part, I think. Truly, though, I go back and forth.

    The room has a certain amount of natural echo as the ceilings are quite high. It's a typical large industrial space. If we do that sort of thing again and don't have it be as impromptu as that was, we'll likely have better sound equipment.

    I played a few things solo but my favorite licks were the ones I played with Dave Bamonte. He's a first class musician and fun to play with. AND a good storyteller... very funny guy.

    ML
     
  6. ScreaminRaider

    ScreaminRaider Piano User

    390
    2
    Apr 22, 2004
    San Antonio, Tx
    It's so purdy. Can't wait for the rest.
     
  7. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

    6,793
    3,560
    Oct 26, 2003
    Baltimore/DC
    Ok, so the alternate fingering was an A. That makes sense. It's funny how using an alternate fingering on some notes can cause it to lock in much better with what's going on around it. At one point I was borrowing a little Yamaha D/Eb from a friend, and me and another fine Army trumpet player named Tom Strayer did the trumpet parts on the Hallelujah Chorus from the Messiah. (Tom's D/Eb was a Yamaha too) Prior to doing the performance, we sat down with the parts and figured out which alternate fingerings to use and where to really lock in the parts.

    If you guys are getting that kind of sound on the microphone on the camera, I can only imagine what the sound will be like if a better sound setup is used. The room must not have hurt you either. This is a little off topic, but Wynton did a recording once where they used the natural acoustics of the church where they recorded as part of the effects of the recording. Wynton would stand in the places that he would stand as if he were performing, and play into a mic, but they also made use of omni-directional mics in the room as part of the overall mix - those are some of my favorite baroque recordings. If you guys played in that room with a similar setup of directional and omni-directional mics and had it professionally mixed, in spite of the shop equipment in the background, it would probably make for a really nice recording.
     
  8. TrentAustin

    TrentAustin Fortissimo User

    3,280
    711
    Oct 28, 2003
    Boston, MA
    Manny, you are amazing! That room must have been shaking with resultant tones! I absolutely love your sound. It's so full of life and personality.... you make me want to play a Monette again.

    Thanks for the clip and I hope that more come up soon...

    Best,

    Trent

    PS: When I had my 937 and 993 I played most of my A's with third valve too.... but that's because I AM lazy.

    :lol:
     
  9. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

    6,793
    3,560
    Oct 26, 2003
    Baltimore/DC
    Another comment on the subject of the alternate fingering - no explanation is necessary - even though the A might lock a little better with the 3rd valve fingering, it doesn't make you lazy for using it - you do what is necessary to make the best music possible.

    Something else that I have noticed, and keep in mind that I know very little about this subject, is that depending on the chord structure, it seems that sometimes if you play a note just a hair high or low of the center of the pitch it "tempers" the chord and really gets it to ring. Does that sound silly or is there something to that? I mean, most of the time a player just uses their ears and makes the minute adjustment automatically, but it sticks in my mind that for instance an A that is played in one chord might not be quite the same A that is played in another - the note is tempered and adjusted both in sound and pitch to best resonate within the chord. Am I nuts or is there some truth to this?
     
  10. JackD

    JackD Mezzo Forte User

    736
    1
    Nov 30, 2003
    Manchester / London
    Wow, very clear resultant tones.

    I got the MO's Alpine recording on Virgin out of my college library yesterday Manny, electrifying sound!
     

Share This Page