Singing thru the Horn

Discussion in 'Wise Talk!' started by talcito, Jul 7, 2005.

  1. talcito

    talcito Piano User

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    Feb 18, 2004
    In an earlier thread you had mentioned the importance of "singing" thru the horn----Can you recommend any particular Arias or Studies that you have found useful in developing this aspect of your style?

    Thank you
     
  2. Alex Yates

    Alex Yates Forte User

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    Aug 11, 2005
    Atlanta, GA
    A great idea for practicing "singing through the horn&q

    I find that if you play songs (yes, the ones classical vocalists study - both in low voice and high voice) it really helps with this aspect of trumpet playing. There are many books available with CDs containing piano parts which is a big perk as well. Pick a song and actually read allowed the words to the song before playing. Then, while playing, try to relay the meaning of the words through your playing - through your music making. Before you know it, you will be "singing" like a bird. :D

    Alex :whistle:
     
  3. wiseone2

    wiseone2 Artitst in Residence Staff Member

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    Nov 19, 2003
    Brooklyn,NY
    I have to confess, that as a Philadelphian of a certain age, I fell in love with the woodwind playing in town.....Tabuteau, Kincaid on a regular basis will change your mind about music. Toss in teachers who were exponents of vowel use in playing the trumpet and you arrive at where my musical heart and soul lie. Marlboro, with an incredible array of mentors around, was finishing school for me. Moyse, Casals and Serkin were singers of the first order.
    Get Kincaidiana, it is a grand book for trumpet players.
    Wilmer
     
  4. Derek Reaban

    Derek Reaban Mezzo Piano User

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    Jun 16, 2005
    Tempe, Arizona
    talcito,

    I have had great success incorporating a “singing sound†into my playing. You may enjoy several threads that I posted at TH that provide suggestions to some specific books and CDs. The first post is called Don’t Drop the Ashtray and discusses Italian Songs and Arias.

    The second post was in a topic called Most Beautiful Melody? and focuses on the Concones studies of Rochut.

    I hope these ideas will help you with your project. It’s really fun to explore some new literature, and these sound models are just fantastic. You might also want to find some Renee Fleming and Jussi Bjorling CDs when your are listening to the Italian Songs and Arias.

    In addition to Wilmer’s suggestion about the Kinkaidiana book, get the Marcel Tabuteau Lesson’s CD. You will be amazed at how these “phrasing†ideas spring to life when you actually hear Tabuteau describe his “dancing numbers†and then demonstrates them on his oboe.

    Thanks Wilmer for gently guiding me to these marvelous Philadelphia musicians!!


    Good luck!
     
  5. dizforprez

    dizforprez Forte User

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    Nov 2, 2003
    Re: A great idea for practicing "singing through the ho


    Alex,

    I have been doing this a lot lately, any books you could recommend by name?

    I have been using low voice books so far.
     
  6. Alex Yates

    Alex Yates Forte User

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    Aug 11, 2005
    Atlanta, GA
    Hello there Diz

    While you can pick up just about any collection of songs by Schumann, Schubert or Mozart, I tend to stick with the ol' Italian Songs and Arias. I use the "24 Italian Songs and Arias of the 17th and 18th Centuries" for medium high voice and low voice (two separate books) put out by Schirmer. If I may, I also recommend listening to some singers. For these particular songs you can't beat Cecilia Bartoli. (I actually had the chance to meet her and Renee Fleming in 1998.) Did you know Cecilia played trumpet before becoming a world class Mezzo Soprano? She is also known for having incredible technique. Just listen to her "Vivaldi" recording and there will be no doubt left in your mind. LOL. :-o I also recommend listening to Sumi Jo's version of the "Queen of the Night Aria" from Mozart's "Magic Flute". Your jaw will hit the floor. (if you give me an email address, I will gladly send you that sound file). Another great collection for the ears is Kathleen Battle's Mozart album. We can learn a lot about phrasing and musicianship from these singers....but I digress.....uh hem......

    Yes, I recommend those Schirmer books. They can be found pretty much anywhere as the repertoire is standard for singers. I am sure you have already found that playing these are great fun and musically satisfying. Whenever I feel stuck musically or want to warm up my sound a bit, I pull a few out and it does the trick. I hope this answers your question.

    Kind regards, Alex Yates
     
  7. dizforprez

    dizforprez Forte User

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    Nov 2, 2003
    Alex,

    Thanks!

    I already have the 24 songs and arias as well as Art songs for school and studio. I will check around and see if I can find some other books.



    thanks again,

    Jason
     
  8. dizforprez

    dizforprez Forte User

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    Nov 2, 2003
    Thanks for the sound file.

    WOW!!!!!!!!!! :D
     
  9. Bill Dishman

    Bill Dishman Piano User

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    Nov 22, 2003
    Gainesville, Florida
    Singing Through the Horn

    I have been a proponent of this concept for many years and while not trained in solfege (to my ever growing dismay) I have advocated singing the intervals and melodies for improvement in playing the horn. Making good phrasing and style decisions.

    However...I recently was made aware of another aspect. At a recent lesson we explored the idea of vocalizing to get the open throat, relaxed concept and even disregarding the actual quality of my voice in regular and falsetto registers, keeping the idea of the vocalist's "Head Tones" resonating behind the sinuses, this transfered to a more free and open tone quality with less physical strain. Thus control and endurance improved dramatically. It was sort of like the proverbial "singing in the shower" idea. Sound like Caruso with all the power and flowing phrases and you will sound good on the horn. (Even if it is only in my own mind that I sound like Caruso.)

    Bill Dishman
    Gainesville, Florida
     

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