single tongue

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by anthony, May 25, 2009.

  1. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    rbdeli,
    I now tongue sometimes between my teeth directly on the lips. It is the most positive secure attack I have found. I think the open ended tonguing may be common US thinking, but it is not what I am hearing here. I only use it on occasion. Just like we do not speak slurred (well most of the time anyway), I believe our playing benefits greatly by greater articulation. Listen to fine radio announcers or TV anchorpeople speak. THAT is the clarity that is beneficial to all of us. Maurice Andrés Hora Legato has been removed from YouTube. The Mendez version ( YouTube - Hora Staccato - Rafael Mendez VISITA http://trompetaalmaximo.blogspot.com/ VERY articulate as is Dokschizers ( YouTube - Timfoei Dokshizer Hora Stacatto) and here a very FUN version by György Geiger ( YouTube - Hora Staccato - Border Guard Big Band feat. György Geiger ) and here the original, notice he doesn't just drag his bow to keep the sound going. He manages to articulate in a way that makes this piece speak! YouTube - Jascha Heifetz plays Hora Staccato
     
  2. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Vulgano tips for single tongue:

    Keep the tongue relaxed, like it is melting in your mouth, and make your tongue tired every day.

    An old Shuebruk exercise: Rhythm--quarter, 4 sixteenths, quarter, 4 sixteenths.... Notes--a major scale, say for example, G. The exercise-- G GGGG G GGGG A AAAA A AAAA B, etc. to g, then downwards to G. Easy, huh? Aha, the mean part--we play then from A to a and back, B to b and back etc. until d to d1 (and back). Then, c to c1 and back, B to b and back, etc. until we reach our original G to g. Afterwards, the tiredness will often be felt inside the throat, where the tongue connects to the hyoid bone. Often the cheeks and corners will complain as well; not a bad thing.

    Have fun!
     
  3. rbdeli

    rbdeli Mezzo Piano User

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    Thanks for the great clips. All three of those trumpters- even in their own style - Mendez, Dokshizer and Geiger all have complete control of their horn. No straining. They just blow. Fun to listen to.



     
  4. operagost

    operagost Forte User

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    Switching to this method (sometimes called "K-tongue modified", I guess because you practice getting the position right by single-tonguing with "k" sounds) allowed me to truly master double-tonguing for the first time, after years of playing. I don't feel too badly about it because Lou Loughnane must have played on eighteen Chicago albums before he found out about this technique.

    I imagine all players are different and for some it wouldn't work.
     
  5. rbdeli

    rbdeli Mezzo Piano User

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    That's it! K-Tongue modified. My teacher was all about technique. This was one thing that I feel hindered my playing. Not until real recently, did I stop doing this, and I feel like it opened up my sound.
     
  6. Trumpetman67

    Trumpetman67 Piano User

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  7. anthony

    anthony Mezzo Piano User

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    tried your exercise sixteenths ,quarter ....etc I am having trouble making the note G for example sound clean and clear it sounds wavery , Iam trying my best I have only been playing about four months and I keep trying Thanks for your help.Anthony
     
  8. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Don't forget the goal here is to make the tongue tired (therefore stronger and quicker). At this point, just keep noticing the wavery G (and bravo that you actually notice stuff like that--some people who have played for years don't listen to themselves!) and anything else that you don't quite like, but don't try to "fix" it at first. Very often we'll automatically correct these kinds of things if we just let our body do it. A cool book is The Inner Game of Tennis, and it talks about our "Self 1" and "Self 2." One part of ourselves just does stuff, and the other part is hyper-critical and bossy and generally messes things up.

    Be patient, and wait for the miracle!

    Thanks for being serious about the trumpet, and don't forget to have fun!
     
  9. anthony

    anthony Mezzo Piano User

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    Thanks for your help and I ordered the book too Inner Game of Tennis I appreciate your help and suggestions Anthony
     
  10. rbdeli

    rbdeli Mezzo Piano User

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    I was doiing some tonguing exercises last night and realized that the placement of my tongue varies with the range I'm playing in. Like Rowuk, sometimes my tongue touches between my teeth. Sometimes, it hits just behind my teeth. I let the tongue go where it wants to go to make the articulation. When I try to think of where it should be placed, it cripples me. I think sometimes we make up too many rules for ourselves: "Your chest should be like this, your chin should go here, your tongue should be placed like this, your neck like this, etc., etc"..

    I was reading a method book a while ago (think it was Claude Gordon), that compared trumpet playing to learning to talk. Do we really think about the placement of our tongue when we learn to talk? No, we just do what it takes to make the words come out of our horn.

    As I heard from someone years ago:
    Too much analysis = paralysis.

    The trumpet requires air. The rest will follow.
     

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