Single Tonguing Speed

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Roy, Jun 9, 2008.

  1. MJ

    MJ Administrator Staff Member

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    Must be nice

     
  2. Tiscione

    Tiscione New Friend

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    Yeah, everything is relative, MJ. I am a slow learner so "quicker" for me means that it only took me about 2 years to get it. ;-)
     
  3. MJ

    MJ Administrator Staff Member

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    :D

     
  4. artiep2

    artiep2 New Friend

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    I'm 76. I played as an extra in the CSO in the late 50's. Worked with Cichowicz and Herseth for 5 years. I laid off for 46 years. Came back in 2008. Single tonguing is laughably slow. I can't sustain 1/16th's over 90bpm for more than 20 measures. Can do 115 for 4+ bars.
     
  5. artiep2

    artiep2 New Friend

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    PS I need advice.
     
  6. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    With the single tongue we are limited at how fast we can play; with multiple tonguing how slow we can play. I focus on a wide overlap.
     
  7. jiarby

    jiarby Fortissimo User

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    the key to cleaning up articulation is speed... LESS SPEED!

    Go as slow as it takes to tongue as cleanly, AND evenly as possible. T tongue AND K tongue. Stacatto and Legato, pp and fff.
    Then slowly, over time gradually increase metronome, but never sacrifice pitch centers, attacks and eveness.

    If you get your tonguing clean when it is SLOW it will be clean as you get faster.

    Plenty of stuff in Arban for working on this!

    Spend plenty of time single K tonguing, across the range that you want to be able to multiple tongue, at least to high C. Alternate T for 2 beats of 16ths, then 2 beats of K's with the goal of them being indistinguishable. Start SLOW! If you can't do it slow, you cant do it faster!
     
  8. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    I'll answer this by relating a story that was told by a percussion clinician at a drumming event I went to. He told the story about how when he first got to college, he wanted to improve his drum roll, so he went to his private instructor and asked him how he could improve his roll. He was hoping that his instructor would have some secret or trick to impart that would transform his drum roll. What his instructor told him was this: "If you want to improve your roll, then roll - 10 minutes a day, every day."

    Of course if you have major technique issues that need to be diagnosed and dealt with using a prescriptive technique, that's one thing, but otherwise, if you want to improve your single tonguing, just do it, and do lots of it. Chances are if you have a minor technique problem then the repetition over time will correct it as long as you approach it in an introspective way and work toward finding better efficiency in your articulation.
     
  9. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    I'll piggy back onto what jiarby said about going slow at first and keeping it clean, but I'm also of the opinion that working articulation without music - just freely with only you and the horn - is a better way to clean it up. Do scales arpeggios, stay on single notes in the staff, whatever, but keep it between you and the horn, and really focus on what's going on with the mechanism so you know how it feels vs how it sounds. I don't like to use written exercises at first for some of this stuff because it's easy to get focused on the notes on the page when the focus needs to be on what's going on with the articulation.
     
  10. Dr.Mark

    Dr.Mark Mezzo Forte User

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    Hi VB,
    You stated:
    "With the single tongue we are limited at how fast we can play; with multiple tonguing how slow we can play."
    ---
    Ain't that the truth!!
    Something that really helped me with clean fast tonguing (single tonguing) and slow double tonguing is knowing how to tongue(articulate) for whistling. How does this work? If you can whistle, you know you can't get a smooth articulation with a stiff tongue. Also, when we whistle, we often think of the "words" to a song which is a good idea to think about if a trumpet player is playing a song that has lyrics.
    If you whistle Mary Had a Little lamb (First single and then double), the articulation should be similar to what's done with trumpet. To get an idea of what I'm talking about, youtube Ron McCroby
    Also, listening to classical music from India and trying to emulate the articulations that percussionists verbalize is handy too.
    Dr.Mark
     

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