Sitting vs standing to practice.

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by turtlejimmy, Jul 18, 2010.

  1. Darten

    Darten Mezzo Piano User

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    In defense of Turtle, I thought the same joke as I was reading this thread.... and yes I laughed when I read his response. But we all know what Rowuk meant.
     
  2. Al Innella

    Al Innella Forte User

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    As I get older, I'm 60 with arthritic knees.I find myself doing all of my practicing and performing except solo's, sitting down.When I was younger I used to do both. I would stand at the beginning for long tones ,flexibility studies,and range exercises, then would sit when working out of Arban's,Clarke, etc.. The biggest no-no I see in most students when sitting, is leaning against the back of the chair. I always tell my students to sit straight up as if at attention and forward on the chair ,as if it were a stool with no back,with both feet flat on the floor.
     
  3. hup_d_dup

    hup_d_dup Piano User

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    My teacher tells me this, and although he is a good teacher, I disagree. When sitting, if you start with your feet flat, and then move them towards the chair so that the weight is now resting on the front of your feet, you will notice that your shoulders move back, which I think is a much better position for good breathing. Watching good symphonic players I see that it is common for them to have their heels off the floor so I don't think it is a bad position. For me, it is more comfortable.
     
  4. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    LYING DOWN is tough. Gravity gives you too much MP pressure. ;-)

    Turtle
     
  5. EdMann

    EdMann Mezzo Forte User

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    Just went through this yesterday when a pro friend arrived to play my little collection. My back was out and since he was standing, I stood and my accuracy, range, etc. was all out the door--- air, air, air. Later, I sat down to practice and viola. Still hurt, but I could get better support sitting under that circumstance.

    ed
     
  6. Dark Knight

    Dark Knight Pianissimo User

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    In my first incarnation I practiced and played sitting down. Fast forward about 30 years as a comeback player, my teach has me standing. Hated it at first, now I feel weird sitting. Can't win ;-)

    David.
     
  7. VetPsychWars

    VetPsychWars Fortissimo User

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    I always used to practice standing but I rehearse and perform sitting, so I'm going to practice that way. No issues with air or how I'm sitting. Like Ed, I have some back issues as well so sitting helps with that.
     
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    We all know how turtles move around, and what they do when danger is approaching. No need to attack an easy but invincible target. If it gets too rough, I have a big pot of boiling water for soup...............

    I do not need to worry about jokes, we all end up living with our own backs. Those that figure out body use earlier can have an easier time later.
     
  9. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Interestingly, turtles (or at least the ones I've known) have mastered the art of the QUICK EXHALE. They have to do this to get into the shell. There's a distinct sound that goes with it. Some of the turtles (definitely the ones from Costa Rica, the painted turtles) can SLEEP UNDERWATER. My pet Diego used to do that. Talk about breath control !!!

    TJ
     
  10. beautgrainger147

    beautgrainger147 Pianissimo User

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    Rotherham
    I find it noticably easier to sit while playing.. on the other hand I find it takes more effort to get the air to sing while sat. Maybe I don't use much air for playing trumpet.
     

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