sliding slide, red rot, and making a leather grip

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by christineka, Jan 3, 2014.

  1. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    While I admit finding a valve guard for a cornet will be extremely difficult, the instruction Rick gives to make one's own is inadequate and itself cause more problems than gains. Tanned leather leaches tannic acid as will in time "eat" at the valve finish. These guards are made of three layers, tanned leather, waterproof plastic film (Mylar(R)) and soft cloth inner layer. As others say, they are still collectors of grit. Too, they must be removed for proper cleaning of the instrument. This said, I would not even suggest that a beginner use one, and I would not allow a beginning student to use one were I tutoring them. They instill a habit that will be later disallowed in band competition, show, and concert.
     
  2. ConnDirectorFan

    ConnDirectorFan Fortissimo User

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    For the slide problem, a cheap and easy fix might be taking some string and tying the two 3rd valve slide braces together, but leaving enough slack in the loop to allow "kicking" the 3rd slide out if a ring is ever installed.* This basic idea worked with my Conn 15A and Getzen 90, neither of which had an actual 3rd slide stop...

    *This also alleviates a problem late-1990s UMI Conn/King horns have, since the 3rd slide has a rim for a "nub" on the adjustable ring to catch on to, but if the ring is replaced with a generic without the same provision, the 3rd slide inconveniently drops out. Funny thing, my Conn 1000B, a former demo horn, seems to be one of the very few that never had a 3rd slide stop rod like most others...but the 3rd slide was frozen in place to the point that I could twirl the horn around my finger multiple times [!]...but a flying horn and a quick catch with my other hand stopped that.
     
  3. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Where do you find it "dirt cheap"? I just paid $8.99 +7% sales tax for a 4 oz. bottle. Too, it is unavailable at Wal-Mart, Drugco, Walgreens, and CVS pharmacies here in US even though all the pharmacists know of it. These chain pharmacies only stock a certain formulary that is often requested and cannot / will not order other. In addition to its health uses, it is my slide grease of choice for brass and the joiner corks of reeds, and the tuner crowns and sections of flutes and piccolos.
     
  4. PiGuy_314

    PiGuy_314 Pianissimo User

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    For the sliding third slide, tying a string or the like to the two valve braces is a good idea for a quick fix. Having a tech get a ring or saddle on there would be nice. In the meantime, use heavy slide grease. I know a lot of kids in marching band who use the string to keep the third slide from falling too far. Me? Slide stop rod. But it's all trumpets here, not cornets.
    I'm not a fan of valve guards/grips either; they trap more than they protect in my opinion. But to each his own. Hope that helps.

    ~Noah
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2014
  5. Pinstriper

    Pinstriper Mezzo Forte User

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    Under $10 for a lifetime supply = dirt cheap. I got mind at Walgreens Lo! - these many years ago when I had a bad head cold and my nose got rubbed raw from too much Kleenex contact. Comes in a tube smaller than toothpaste, a little goes a long way.
     
  6. ConnDirectorFan

    ConnDirectorFan Fortissimo User

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    The Conn threaded slide rod or the Yamaha-type slide stop are good permanent options if a permanent option is desired - I have a friend who marched in what he called a "high-energy and motion band" where the 3rd slide on his King cornet [something like a model 603 ca. late 1990s; relied on a stop on the ring to work, but the ring was a generic replacement] would shoot out [!!!] during most performances, and I told him about the string idea, which worked up until the string somehow snapped...!
     
  7. Pinstriper

    Pinstriper Mezzo Forte User

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    Shoelace or rubber band would take care of this, and would have all kinds of bubba-cred.
     
  8. PiGuy_314

    PiGuy_314 Pianissimo User

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    Yeah, that happened to one of our trumpets during a competition (!). The girl nearly fainted as her slide began its descent towards the ground...she caught it, but her heart stopped for a second, I'm sure...since then, she uses a hair tie, and then reinforces that with a shoelace.

    ~Noah
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2014
  9. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    Since there's no way to use the slide for note tuning, just pull the slide out, warp the legs together a very tiny bit, and "spring" them open to get it back on. There will be enough friction to keep it in place, but it can still be moved/removed when necessary.
     
  10. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

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    All good ideas here. Heavier slide grease (have you tried Vaseline?) would be my first try. It is a shame the tech didn't fix the horn. If he charged you, I would carry it back, explain that advice from a news group with a number of horn techs was he should have expanded the slide tubing so the slide would not drop out - and say you don't expect to pay for it since you already paid. I believe it is a very fast process- like 5 minutes. I probably would not worry about adding anything to make the slide adjustable. Likely not worth the expense. Don't feel guilty as he will learn to lip the notes and, if he ever has a horn with such rings or adjustments, it doesn't take long to begin using them. Horns, including 2 pro horns - a Super and Strad- that I had for the majority of my career didn't have 1st valve adjustments. About 5 years ago I finally got a horn with one and learning to use it only took a few days- I.e., it isn't going to a habit that has to be learned in youth.
     

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