Slow progress

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by nomojo, Feb 26, 2008.

  1. nomojo

    nomojo New Friend

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    Oct 15, 2007
    Coffs Harbour NSW Oz
    I am a beginner whose progress seems to have stalled. I suspect, from what I have read, that I need to include some breathing exercises as part of my warm-up.

    Any advice on this would be appreciated. I have seen the term "circle of breath" mentioned. Is this part of it?

    Also, what are pedal notes?

    Best regards,

    Nomojo
     
  2. Eeviac

    Eeviac Piano User

    Have faith. I am also a total newb, and had the most awesome practice session today. It just takes putting in the work, try working out stuff on the mouthpiece alone, try playing some songs you *really* like, vary it a little but STAY ON TRACK and you're in good company here.
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Nomojo,
    what does your trumpet teacher say?

    We are all in agreement that a daily routine makes playing consistent. Improvements come with the things that you do BEYOND the daily routine.

    My suggestion is at least an hour a day, 20 minutes breathing, longtones and slurs, 20 minutes tunes and 20 minutes technical work - in that order. Even then, you will reach a plateau that the hour can support, the next step is 2 hours.........................
     
  4. Firestas'1

    Firestas'1 Piano User

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    Dec 21, 2006
    New Jersey
    Pedal notes are the notes below what is considered the normal range of the instrument (below F sharp below the staff). Some teachers recommend playing these as a means of traning the embouchure to relax while still producing a tone. These notes are very difficult to play in tune but with practice they can be played.

    You should also incorporate som relaxation techniques into your playing. Tension is the enemy when playing Trumpet, any tension in your upper body will affect your sound in a negative way. Taking deep relaxed breaths will help.

    As far as your breathing when playing take a breath that completely fills your lungs then immediately start the note to release the breath, do not hold the breath prior to commencing the note as this will also create tension.
     
  5. Jude

    Jude Piano User

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    Dec 2, 2007
    Hi Nomojo - Rowuk has described his "circle of breath" technique numerous times, but finding anything with the search feature isn't all that easy so I've just copied this from a recent post:

    Rowuk: "start by thinking of breathing as a circle. The left side is inhaling, the right exhaling. Note at the top and bottom of the circle that there are no bumps, gaps or sharp angles - inhale and exhale that way. Do it a couple of times until it is S M O O T H. The top point of a circle is infinitely small, your transition from in- to exhale should also be: relaxed and not of great length! Then replace exhale with play (on the mouthpiece to keep your routine). PAY ATTENTION to the top and bottom of that circle of breath! Once it works with the mouthpiece, try it with the horn. Practice slowly, without the tongue until it is perfect for long tones, then try and add the tongue at the TOP of the circle. This takes a while to synchronize, but if you go slowly, the rewards pay off VERY quickly!
    The end result on a gig is that you inhale on even multiples of the beat to create that circle of breath. Concentrate on the bump free transition from in- to exhale and vice versa!!
    The answer lies in the slow motion approach to dissecting problems!"

    (This is not the "circle of breath" of yoga, so googling on the term might not get you back to this.)
     
  6. Jude

    Jude Piano User

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    Dec 2, 2007
    There's a YouTube series of French horn lessons with Hermann Baumann. In No. 3 he has the student blow at a candle he holds about a meter in front of her - she is to bend the flame without extinguishing it, just keep it flickering. It's a way of developing and testing control, keeping the air moving. It might be something to try - done over time, it could provide visible signs of progress.

    The video is at YouTube - French horn Herman Baumann class (part 3) (or search on "Herman Baumann" - one 'n' in Herman, two in Baumann). The audio is in German and the subtitles in French, but the idea is clear enough.
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2008
  7. nomojo

    nomojo New Friend

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    Oct 15, 2007
    Coffs Harbour NSW Oz
    G'day Jude,

    Thanks for taking the time to reprint the "circle of breath". Greatly appreciated. You were correct. I could not find it with the search feature.

    Best Regards,

    Nomojo
     
  8. nomojo

    nomojo New Friend

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    Oct 15, 2007
    Coffs Harbour NSW Oz
    Thanks for that.

    Nomojo
     

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