Slow/sticky slides

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by operagost, Jun 17, 2009.

  1. operagost

    operagost Forte User

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    Any recommendations on how to get the third valve slide moving freely on my old 22B? I was thinking of using my dremel to take off any corrosion inside the tubing, because the inner slide itself is already quite polished and yet it moves only with significant effort.
     
  2. s.coomer

    s.coomer Forte User

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    I would not be messing with the inside slide. Instead take it to a good repair tech. If you get in there you could take too much and end up with a leaking slide. Remember, you can take off, but you can't put back anything you take off.
     
  3. operagost

    operagost Forte User

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    I suppose I should have mentioned that taking it to a tech isn't an acceptable answer. If I were to ask here if I should do trivial maintenance like replacing cork on the water keys, I'm sure I would get a dozen responses recommending I have that done by a "pro" as well.
     
  4. s.coomer

    s.coomer Forte User

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    No, I do my own corks etc. However, I have played professionally for many years and would not go about altering the fit of the horn without professional help. If you don't want us to be honest then why do you ask?
     
  5. operagost

    operagost Forte User

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    Obviously, a tech can do this, or else we'd be throwing horns in the garbage. If I visited a hot rodding board and asked for opinions on welding headers, no one would think of sending me to the shop. If I wanted to go to the shop, I'd drop it off and let them have all the fun. For some reason, it's acceptable among musicians to insist they have a tech do everything instead of learning how to do some of the things that, while more difficult than replacing springs and corks, fall short of the skill required to replate or fix dents.
     
  6. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    In light of your need to take matters into your own hands (I don't disagree if you feel you have some competency) you may like to gently twist a strip of white Scotchbrite into the tubing and see if that helps. The white Scotchbrite is the least abrasive and shouldn't remove any metal or stretch the tubing. You might also consider wiping down the male section of the slide (mind the decorative surface finish). Give everything a good rinse, a relube, and see what you get. Then step two - the tech.
     
  7. Brekelefuw

    Brekelefuw Fortissimo User

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    If your slide tubes are out of alignment and you try to fix it yourself, a mistake could mean that your first valve becomes seized.

    Don't use a dremel, get some of that synthetic #000 steel wool and lightly buff the inner slides, or some of that spongy abrasive pad stuff, but very fine grade. You don't want to remove more material than necessary.

    Also check if you have any dents in the slide tube
     
  8. dwp63

    dwp63 Pianissimo User

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    I use 0000 steel wool then white rouge on a buffing wheel for the slide. If that isn't enough then I use 220 grit lapping compound on a flannel cloth with a rod and run it into the tube. Then clean with a clean flannel cloth and a good washing.
     
  9. knotty

    knotty New Friend

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    I would not use a Dremel, too small tool area and can take off too much material with one slip. Do it by hand little by little.
     

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