Slurring vs Tonguing in Playing

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Mark_Kindy, Jan 13, 2012.

  1. Mark_Kindy

    Mark_Kindy Mezzo Forte User

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    I've had a question about the difference in playing when slurring in tonguing.

    When I play, I find slurring to be extremely beneficial. What I mean by that, is any passage I come across, I notice I keep a more even tone and it guides me into using my air properly when slurring it, than when articulating each note.

    Generally, I feel I have a good base on tonguing and articulation. However, I was wondering if any had suggestions for maintaining air and technique and feel of slurring, during articulated passages.

    To clarify, I'm looking for something more specific than "practice". As well, I already have experience with not cutting off the air when tonguing, that's not my problem.

    Thanks to all in advance.
     
  2. Pete Anderson

    Pete Anderson Pianissimo User

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    Do you have trouble with multiple tonguing on high notes?

    Have you researched anchor tonguing or KTM?
     
  3. Etiennse

    Etiennse Pianissimo User

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    I find it the same way too. With lower notes I can only get to them clearly through slurring. :dontknow:
     
  4. Mark_Kindy

    Mark_Kindy Mezzo Forte User

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    Yes, I have issues with multiple tonguing above a D in the staff

    I've tried to stay away from self teaching (after doing it for 6 years) to make sure I don't learn something incorrectly. Feel free to expand on that?
     
  5. codyb226

    codyb226 Banned

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    Slurring is a lot easier and keeps the tone nice and smooth. I find myself slurring during a legato section when it should be tongued. Do you tongue with the tip of your tongue, or the fat part of it? I know you have heard this before, but tongue behind your teeth. Try and keep your airflow consistent and just interrupt the air when you tongue, dont stop it.
     
  6. codyb226

    codyb226 Banned

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    Tip of the tongue, just light and quick
     
    coolerdave likes this.
  7. Mark_Kindy

    Mark_Kindy Mezzo Forte User

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    I use the tip of my tongue, and as I mentioned in the OP, I do not cut off the airflow when I tongue
     
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  8. Al Innella

    Al Innella Forte User

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    i don't use the tip of my tongue to articulate. I use the center of the tongue to articulate,with the tip behind my lower teeth.
    When tonguing think of slurring the notes,then add the tongue. Slurring or tonguing shouldn't affect the way your embouchure works.
     
  9. Pete Anderson

    Pete Anderson Pianissimo User

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    I think you shouldn't be so wary of doing research and "self-teaching". No teacher (or at least, very few teachers...) is going to be able to tell exactly what's going on when you play. Feel free to experiment and try to learn on your own, just tell your teacher what you're doing and check in to make sure you aren't screwing yourself up.

    Anchor tonguing is basically keeping the tip of your tongue touching the back of your bottom lip or bottom teeth (somewhere in that area, anyways, experiment with what sounds/feels/works better), and articulating with the middle part of the tongue. Try a "duh" "or deeh" type syllable. The idea is kind of that if you play with a tongue arch, this type of tonguing requires less movement and will keep everything fairly similar between when you're slurring and when you're tonguing.

    Think about what happens with your tongue when you slur from low C up to high C - the tongue probably raises up with the "eee" syllable. Now think about what happens if you slur up to high B and then tongue the high C with a "too" syllable - you are kind of raising the front of your tongue and dropping the middle part. This causes a change in the way everything feels and works together in your mouth/embouchure. Now think about what happens when you do the same thing but use more of a "dee" syllable while keeping the tip of your tongue touching your lip or teeth - you can articulate without disturbing the tongue arch.

    I found this made a big difference with my consistency between slurring/articulating, and also with tonguing above the staff.
     
  10. Mark_Kindy

    Mark_Kindy Mezzo Forte User

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    I think this is the idea Pete is putting forth as well. And I agree, the difference between articulation and slur shouldn't interrupt my embouchure, but then that's why this post =)
    Thanks for the advice!
     

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