Slurring

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Passion, Jun 19, 2009.

  1. Passion

    Passion Pianissimo User

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    Jun 11, 2009
    Why do I have trouble slurring the higher I go? And it's not even that high. What are ways to improve it in practice?

    And I recently switched mouth pieces, but I tried to switch back to the old one but it hurts and leaves a mark above my mouth so I'm sticking with the new one. It doesn't hurt at all. And the old one has always left a mark above my mouth, even when I tried my best to use little pressure so I'm sticking with the new one no matter what. How long will it take for me to completely adjust to it and build my range back up?
     
  2. Rellon

    Rellon New Friend

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    Apr 10, 2008
    Slow and steady practice; you can begin with the valve positions then scales, chromatic then progress from there. keep in mind that you are playing a wind instrument not a lip instrument so use a big breath every time you breathe, and finally, play softly, even as you ascend

    Slow

    Steady

    Soft

    I hope this helps

    Rellon
     
  3. Pseudonym

    Pseudonym Pianissimo User

    Age:
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    May 23, 2009
    Dallas
    Geez Passion, you've had quite a bit of trouble these past few weeks, haven't you! It took me two weeks to switch from my 3C to the mouthpiece I'm using right now, you just have to be patient. The first thing I'd work on was sound, since if you don't sound nice, no one will want to hear you play - right? (;

    Slurring? I'd start with a Chicowitz exercise, or maybe just slurring from Concert F chromatically up. G, G#, G; G, A, G; G, Bb, B; up as high as you need it to go. After about D, you should probably switch to C, C#, C so it's easier on your lips since you're having a bit of trouble.
     
  4. Passion

    Passion Pianissimo User

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    Jun 11, 2009
    Why'd you switch from 3c? Is it not good or something?

    I'm getting better on my 3c mouthpiece. Also, I'm talking about lip slurring because that's what I have to do for lessons. What can I do to improve it with high notes?
     
  5. Rellon

    Rellon New Friend

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    Apr 10, 2008
    Lots of air support, use the articulations;
    Low F#to first Middle C, use TAH,
    C# to C1, use TU,
    C#1 to C2 TEE
    TEEE for anything higher.

    This helps you conceptualise what your mouth should be shaped like when you play.
     
  6. Rellon

    Rellon New Friend

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    Apr 10, 2008
    Stick with one mouthpiece for now. See how it plays after you have gotten accostomed to it. A mouthpiece is a very personal piece of equipment as no two payers are the same. What is good for you and your ability at this point may not be the same for someone else. If you like the sound you are getting and your teacher is ok with it and it isn't causing you pain, then stick with that mouthpiece.

    TRUMPET

    Tone
    Reading
    Understanding
    Musicianship
    Power
    Endurance
    Technique

    These in order.

    Rellon
     
  7. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    Jan 4, 2009
    Clarksburg, WV
    Slurring is tough! I tell students that instead of thinking "lip slurs" think "tongue slurs"
    When you think about it, isn't how the tongue changes the oral cavity a major factor in slurring? I sometimes tell students to think of trumpet playing like they do whistling. When you whistle, you change the oral cavity as the note goes higher or lower.
    Granted The Bernoulli principle applies as it pertains to the size of the aperture and sound. However, if you think "tongue slurs" instead of lip slurs it might find it a lot easier.
     
  8. Liblip

    Liblip New Friend

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    Mar 29, 2008
    Perfect your slurring in the lower range, the rest will follow. Be concerned whenever you're leaving a mark on your chops- there's no need for it. -Ed
     
  9. Pseudonym

    Pseudonym Pianissimo User

    Age:
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    May 23, 2009
    Dallas
    I only switched from my 3C mouthpiece to a jazz mouthpiece because I was playing Lead for my band as well as for a few other gigs. Bach 3C, from what I gathered while playing it, gave me a more classical sound and I'm not a fan of it. I like the dirtier sound that my newer mouthpiece gives me. 3C is not a bad mouthpiece, there's really not a "bad" mouthpiece out there, it's all a matter of preference in my opinion.

    How can you improve your range on your 3C -or- how can you improve your lips slurs register?

    I'd start slurring low so you can get the feel for the mouthpiece. For the first two weeks or so, I didn't leave the staff for fear of developing bad habits with the mouthpiece. Once you learn a bad habit, it takes about double the time to un-learn it. Take it slow, you've got a few months off for summer, you'll be perfectly fine taking it slow. Don't leave the staff until you've made sure (and triple checked) that you aren't forming any of the basic bad habits: excessive mouthpiece pressure, angling the horn up, bad sound; elementary things that you learned in the first two years of playing. I'll even constantly go back and re-learn all my elementary concepts (maybe that's why lessons' teachers are so good.. since that's all they do. xD) just to help myself. :)
     
  10. trpt2345

    trpt2345 Mezzo Forte User

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    May 21, 2006
    Morelia, Mexico
    Rome wasn't built in a day. Take your time. Air flow and flexibility exercises are very valuable, Clarke Technical Studies, Schlossberg, the Charles Colin Lip Flexibilities. It's like barbecue, low and slow is the way to go. I can't tell without seeing you in person why you're having trouble in the upper register, but my hunch would be a lack of sufficient air support as you go up. Patience.
     

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