Slurring

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Passion, Jun 19, 2009.

  1. Passion

    Passion Pianissimo User

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    Jun 11, 2009
    I think I've been surprisingly patient.:shock: My attention span is pretty bad, yet I do the fifthteen minute long tones, 30 minute slurs a day along with my other practice.

    I think I'm motivated to do this stuff now because I have a trumpet teacher and I dont want to disappoint anyone.
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Passion,
    it is tougher to slur in the upper register before your chops are together. The trumpet gets ever less efficient the higher we play, we have to have more "tension" in the embouchure and our breathing is VERY critical. That is why you (an many others) have trouble.

    That being said, you also have all of the tools to fix it. Practice softly! Practice slurs with a metronome. Don't worry if your sound gets thinner when you play higher. Until your breathing, chops and tongue are perfectly synchronized, you will have to work harder. If you "force" the higher notes by playing more loudly, you will hurt the building process. they need to "just come" then you are playing more efficiently and can build good habits.
     
  3. mrtrpt

    mrtrpt New Friend

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    Sep 23, 2007
    Here is a practical idea for helping with range: (I'm not a "screamer" so if that's what you want to be, maybe this won't work. But if you want to be a good solid player this will definitely work)

    Determine what your comfortable range is, on both the high and low ends. Meaning if you had to sight read a solo in front of the world and you looked at the page what is the highest note that wouldn't make you start praying! and what is the lowest note. So let's say that it is a G on top of the staff and a low A.

    Now take that and make it smaller by a whole step on each end so you have a range of a low B to an F on top of the staff. Now play everything you can in that range for the next week and make it sound AMAZING.

    And the rule is you CANNOT leave these boundaries. You must keep every single note that you play inside that range for the whole week. This doesn't mean you have to limit the exercises or solos or whatever that you play. Just if the notes in the music go higher or lower than your boundary you just skip over them or play them down or substitute other notes for them.

    Example: Say my range is what we said low B to F on top of the staff on C trumpet. If I am practicing Petrouschka there are only two notes in the whole excerpt that I have to substitute, the two high A's. So i could just play the rhythm like I'm going up the A, but keep playing an F instead.

    Make a game out of it. Make sure you are consistently going up and down covering this whole range equally. You should be totally secure on every note in this range.

    After a week expand out a half step on each end, and then after that week expand a half step again and you are back to your original comfort zone. Keep the process going.

    The thing that most people do is try and extend their range when their "usable" or "money" range isn't as strong as it should be to facilitate this. By taking these 2-3 weeks to forget about the "problem" and just work on creating a solid foundation many "problems" will start to go away.

    This has really worked well for me as range was always a "problem" for me growing up. But I found that it wasn't really a "problem", it was more in how I was approaching things.

    This is basically a spin off I came up with on Chris Gekker's idea to speeding up tonguing. Where you find your fastest single tongue speed for a minute, slow it down by 20 clicks and then start to work your way back up. For some reason when we start well within our capabilities, and start to build from there, we can create much better and more lasting results. I think that this is because we are building from a point and feeling of real strength and security and compounding on that, rather than building from a point of "just being able to do it" and compounding on that...

    MR
     
  4. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    Passion, you say you are doing lip slurs for your lesson. I assume these are private trumpet lessons. Isn't your teacher showing you how to aprouch them? That's his job.
     
  5. Passion

    Passion Pianissimo User

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    Jun 11, 2009
    Well he did.

    -not to much pressure
    -play really quite
    -your jaw should disconnect to form a bigger aperature

    Yeah, he tels me all this.
     
  6. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    Did he mention air flow? Good air flow/support is essential to be successful with lip slurs. Are you thinking of blowing THROUGH the notes? Making the air do the work. Slow and medium soft. Only do them as fast as you can do them cleanly. As rowuk says it takes time. Remember you are developing muscle co-ordination. Only play them in a register where you don't strain or force the notes
     
  7. Advancedtrumpeter93

    Advancedtrumpeter93 New Friend

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    Jun 16, 2009
    Virginia
    Hi! I've been playing Trumpet for about 5 years and I still cannot get slurs down. I really Don't know what it is about it that makes it soo hard. Everywhere I go , I see trumpet players slurring perfectly yet I can't becuase I'm soo far behind. When I last practiced it, It seems that I can't slurr smooth enough from one note. For example Middle G to 4th space C. Everytime I slur, my G goes way sharp and it sounds like I'm honking, without making it smooth. My ultimate goal is to slur well so I can play fast passages and slow passageswith precisison , but I can't. I have the recommended materials , but I just don't know where to start.

    -Micah:shhh:
     
  8. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    What does he mean, your jaw should disconnect to form a bigger aperature? I never heard of this and I've been teaching for 30 years.
     

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