Slurring

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by CaptainAddy, Jan 16, 2011.

  1. hahkeystah

    hahkeystah Piano User

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    its all about the embouchure. try doing lip slurs from middle c up to g, up to high c, and back down, then b up to f# up to b, etc down the partial, then start at g on the clef, and go up. i do that for about 10 mins in my warm up excersize. great way to perfect those jumps, and increases range and endurance dramatically, very quickly
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I would like to bang a big baseball bat up aside the head of the person that recommended keeping the aperature the same. Anyone with even a little knowledge about how face muscles work realize that this is not a good way to do things.

    Slurs are EASY, you just start in a range that works with a BIG breath and expand as your face develops. Moving forward too fast like anything else in life means you start twisting other things around to compensate for the lack of "habits". Twisting face, chest and breathing is a BIG nono.

    My advice: slow down. Slurs actually are accomplished by forcing the trumpet to do something that it doesn't want to all by itself. The pedal note is one wavelength in the horn, the first octave (low C) is two, the G is 3, 3rd space C is 4, E is 5 wavelengths and G is 6. We actually have to overblow the horn slightly to get the multiple wavelengths to resonate. That is why BREATH SUPPORT is always worse than your slurring ability.

    An intelligent daily routine with longtones, slurs, lots of tunes and at the end, technical studies is a secret recipe for getting better.
     
  3. hahkeystah

    hahkeystah Piano User

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    Rowuk, why do you recommend technical studies at the end of a session? I'm used to doing them after the slurs, before the tunes (and follow tunes with more longtones as a cool-down)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 18, 2011
  4. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    rowuk sez:
    I would like to bang a big baseball bat up aside the head of the person that recommended keeping the aperature the same.
    --
    Please!!!
    For Pete's sake take the bat to their knees. How are they ever gonna learn to get it right if you just performed a Pete Rose lobotomy on them?
    Honestly I don't know if a lip slur can physically be done if the aperture isn't adjusted to to where it needs to be.
    Possibly, keeping the aperture static and then use mouthpiece pressure to change the notes but that changes the aperture too and probably wouldn't work very well.
    Wouldn't keeping the aperture the same create only one pitch? Don't answer, I know the answer.
     
  5. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    Capt.Addy sez:
    I talked to an accomplished friend of mine, and he recommends a slur pattern from above the staff C to G, to B to F#, and so on, then going back up, without changing the aperture, only the speed of air.
    ------
    Your friend's an asshole when it comes to trumpet advice. Keep the friend but get your trumpet advice from someone else.
    You can't change the notes without changing the size of the hole. If you keep the aperture the same, the pitch will stay the same.
    Try this:
    >Only use enough mouthpiece pressure to cause a seal with the mouthpiece.
    >Play a "soft" middle C
    >Do not push the mouthpiece (not even a little) into the lips and increase the air speed. >What happens?
    Like I said, keep the friend, but verify what they say when it comes to how to play a trumpet..
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Very easy: TUNES are the reason that we play and unfortunately too many trumpet players perform like they just got done with a session of technical studies. You perform like you practice. I think it is an insult to the composer to play "beat". Technical studies do not suffer at the end of the practice session - MUSIC sure does.

    Just imagine what having maximum dynamics and chop flexibility could give your artistic interpretation. I think this is the difference between an animal and an artist.


    Markie, the aperature discussions are real no-brainers for me. Those that focus on the aperature instead of exercizes promoting synergy between chops, air and body already have the lobotomy.
     
  7. fraserhutch

    fraserhutch Mezzo Piano User

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    I totally get what the OP's friend was getting at. Of COURSE you aperture has to change to move from partial to partial, but it's a very subtle change, and if a student consciously attempts to do so, they will do too much.

    In fact, what I see in a lot of "students" as it were is far too much facial movement moving from partial to partial. I also had this problem until I was kicked in the butt about it.

    What the OP's friend is getting at is exactly what James Stamp is getting at: you want to use as little chop movement and aperture movement as you can get away with.

    So, what you are striving for is the FEELING of no change to the embouchure and aperture. There are those of us who believe if you think tongue and air, the aperture will take care of itself in time.
     

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