Slurring

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by alant, Oct 20, 2013.

  1. alant

    alant Pianissimo User

    189
    8
    Aug 18, 2009
    Rochdale UK
    When slurring from one note to another should it be clean i,e if slurring down from F to A should you not hear any other notes between, if so how do you make it clean with no other notes in there?
     
  2. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

    8,612
    2,128
    Sep 20, 2009
    New York State USA
    practice, practice, practice ----- ((also get the pitch in your mind from one note to another ----- play each note separately when in practice, then do the slurs ---- it should help when your mind connects with what you want to do))
     
  3. larry tscharner

    larry tscharner Forte User

    1,465
    657
    Apr 30, 2010
    dubuque iowa
    When slurring the two notes are right next to eachother but you do not hear the notes in between as in a gliss on the trombone. When tounging there is a stoppage of air that leaves a little space between the notes that is absent in a slur. It is not true that notes that are slurred are not seperate tones as there is a distinct change in pitch between one and the next, just no tiny empty spot between them. If the notes to be slurred are far enough apart on the scale then there may be some changes in airflow that go along with the lack of tounging, but you probably already realise that. The intent of the slurr is to make the phrase smooth and seemless, the individual notes are still distinct tones, just butted close together. OK? Hope this helps. Best wishes.
     
  4. redintheface

    redintheface Pianissimo User

    244
    190
    Nov 8, 2010
    Bath, UK
    ^^what they said :D

    I play the trombone as well as the trumpet and the trombone is even harder to slur, due to the movement of the slide. The best book to explain this (for trombone players) is How Trombonists Do It. It's helped my trumpet playing too.

    Then practice, practice, practice.
     
  5. JNINWI

    JNINWI Piano User

    413
    193
    Apr 26, 2011
    Earth
    Lets take your F down to an A as an example. To remove the “Partials” between the two and keep it a clean slur, you need good air support, I mean GOOD air support, moving the air directly through the horn with minimal mouthpiece pressure. Think about your sound centred about 6 inches past your bell, this is where you want to concentrate, keeping in mind of producing a full, rich core sound. This will remove any partials….. Now go do as they say above….practice, practice, practice…. Colin advanced lip flexibilities is a great book for this.
     
  6. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

    16,408
    7,522
    Dec 22, 2008
    Virginia
    All the above!!!
     
  7. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

    8,612
    2,128
    Sep 20, 2009
    New York State USA
    or get a baritone -- or marching trombone ---- ROFL ROFL ROFL and still (practice, practice, practice) ---- but, YES, I concur -- the trombone helps my trumpet playing (only been a trombone player for a year or so -- and I see the progress on the trumpet is enhanced)
     
  8. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

    16,408
    7,522
    Dec 22, 2008
    Virginia
    Did you know that the marching trombone was also called a flugelbone? I didn't but found out this weekend!!!
     

Share This Page