Small Lip Issue

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by bach2112, Jun 18, 2013.

  1. bach2112

    bach2112 New Friend

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    Jun 12, 2010
    Well. It is summer again and that means more time to practice. Horay! And I have been doing just that. But I have a question on lip swelling. The under side of my bottom lip seems to be a little bit swollen up and this is probably from over working my chops. I play about 3-4 hours a day and I am trying to build that up. I have been doing everything playing wise. Working on range, power, the Arbans book, the Clarke book trying to sharpen my skills (especially that 3rd finger haha) and even sit ups and running to help with my breathing. So what I am really asking is, what should I do to reduce that swelling under my lip? I have shown lots of progress in my first 3 weeks of summer, but this one is just off. Maybe it is because I may have overplayed last week? - Bach2112
     
  2. DaTrump

    DaTrump Forte User

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    You give us very little to work with. 3-4 is what is expected from us at my school but not all at once.

    What is your practice routine?

    How long do you warm up?

    Have long and often do you take a break?

    Do you drink water when you practice?

    How loud are you playing?

    Is everything balls to walls kind of exercises or are you slipping in nice and easy stuff, or maybe a few etudes?
     
  3. bach2112

    bach2112 New Friend

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    Jun 12, 2010
    I apologize. I have been playing trumpet for 7 years now, and I am about to go into my first year in college. I try to practice everything balanced but I tend to lean more to the range stuff a little bit. My warm up is about 5 minutes. I practice once in the morning for about 10 mins. just to get everything flowing, thing I usually wait about 3 hours, then play for an hour, then off an hour, then on. So its around 3 1/2 - 4 hours daily give or take, and is broken up throughout the day. I sometimes drink cold water when I play. More not than so. I try to play at my largest dynamic contrast. I do play some balls to the wall stuff when I am playing high stuff. And yes, I do play etudes and solos when I practice, like right now I am working on the hyden trumpet concerto 1st movement.
     
  4. Cornyandy

    Cornyandy Fortissimo User

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    As Da Trump says you have given us little to work with, it does sound like a little bit of over work on the old chops or that old chestnut, mouthpiece pressure. If you are concentrating on range it is very easy to do this unknowingly.
     
  5. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    Hi Bach2112,

    In general, it sounds like you're playing too much. How do you feel when you put the horn down after each practice session? Is there still some gas left in the tank, or are you worn out?

    How much were you playing before summer vacation? If you were previously playing 1 hour a day, and immediately increased to 4 hours a day, then the answer may be simple -- play less and slowly work your way up.

    Mike
     
  6. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Play less. Just cause you can play more doesn't mean you should. Played an hour, move to 1 1/2, then 2 and so on.
     
  7. DaTrump

    DaTrump Forte User

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    Huntsville, Texas
    Here's my recommendation for a summer practice schedule.

    Wake up: With a tuner, do Chicowitz, the first pattern, and go down by half steps like it says. Use a breath attack, no tongue till your first practice. DO NOT SLUR UP. DO NOT SLUR UP. I repeat DO NOT SLUR UP. This will create unnecessary tension. When the exercise has you go up, add a small little break and breath attack again. This is now your initial warm up. Do it before every session.

    Session 1: Do this about an hour later or two later. 45-60 minutes. Rest as much as you play. This session is less of a practice and more of a wake up. It should be nice and relaxed, and you shouldn't feel tired after it. This is the time to do Clarke studies in all keys, Stamp, Breathing and pretty etudes like Bordogni.

    Session 2: Do this midday, maybe after lunch. 45-60 minutes. Rest as much as you play. This is the hard practice, this is your "technical" practice of the day. Do some technical etudes, and flow etudes, Clarke, Arban... And now you can start to push your range. Do some slur studies (UP to 15 minutes). Irons and Schlossberg are good one. And finally, run you scales in the Arban 4 pattern, major or minor. Do flats one day, sharps another and at the end of the week, do both. You can always throw in some multi tonguing for fun.

    Session 3: Final session of the day. 60-90 minutes. Rest as much as you play. This is the practice session where you work on your music, so whether it's just the Haydn, or a whole bunch of ensembles, this is the time to work on it.

    You may be thinking, that's not a lot of time spent on a tough piece of music. Your first two workouts are designed to make music easier for you, so instead just CAN you play it, you can focus on making music. Most importantly you have to be really efficient with your time; you can't goof off for 30 minutes and tell me you've practiced an hour. I'm not saying you do, but it happens. And take my advice for what it's worth, adjust it to fit you. Is this my schedule? No. Is it a start to find what works for you? You better believe.
     
  8. bach2112

    bach2112 New Friend

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    Jun 12, 2010
    This sounds like a great idea. I am def. going to try this. Thank you very much.
     

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