So how do you respectfully critque another Trumpet Player?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Eclipsehornplayer, Apr 25, 2006.

  1. Rimshot

    Rimshot Pianissimo User

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    Feb 14, 2005
    Atlanta
    Not brown nosing at all (shame!)

    The guy obviously got some clue, somehow, and acted on it. If it was his own initiative, then the postive reinforcement of your compliment was the perfect followup. Note that the implication that what he changed was better than what he was doing is also there, but in a way that can't possibly cause acrimony.

    (That he is a MD, and nonetheless receptive to change is all the more remarkable! :lol: )
     
  2. Eclipsehornplayer

    Eclipsehornplayer Forte User

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    Sep 14, 2005
    Metro Detroit
    Brown Nose! Thanks Chuck!

    Thanks to everyone.. I was very pleased with how this all played out. As always I've received a ton of good advice from the forum so thanks to you all.

    Change is usually never easy. I suspect that he had help in realizing a change was necessary but he did not indicate that to me which is fine.

    The piece sounded much better and to me that is all that matters...

    Thanks again guys... :grouphug:
     
  3. Joe DiMonte

    Joe DiMonte Mezzo Forte User

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    Apr 30, 2006
    Pittsburgh,Pa
    Re: So how do you respectfully critque another Trumpet Playe


    It's the Director's responsible to point out his short comings.
    However,since it's a community band,I don't understand the fuss.

    On a professional level,Art Blakey who had hired John Gilmore on the advise of Lee Morgan had problems with John's solo and the directions he was attempting to take the band (The Messangers)...Art replaced him .

    Horace Silver had a directional problem with Woody Shaw & Tyrone Washington (Tenor). Mr.Silver disbanded the band.
    In summary: If you are not the Director/Leader,lay low.
     
  4. Eclipsehornplayer

    Eclipsehornplayer Forte User

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    Sep 14, 2005
    Metro Detroit
    Yeah that's pretty much what I had decided to do.

    The fuss was simply that the music could have been played in a more pleasing tone. The solo called for a very melodic, legato, and full sound.

    The player who was college educated in music should have recognized this and eventually did thank goodness.

    The fuss is just meerly about sounding good. Imagine Chuck Mangione playing feels so good with a "trying to blow a 500 LB canary through a straw squeezed off kind of sound" Wouldn't sound good right?

    Same thing here. That's all.

    Either way it worked out in the end. A mouthpiece change and the problem was cured. He played a very good solo which fit in the piece quite well.
     
  5. Joe DiMonte

    Joe DiMonte Mezzo Forte User

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    Apr 30, 2006
    Pittsburgh,Pa
    Like they say:"All's well that ends well. "
    I understand your quest for perfection and excellence but you shouldn't lose sight of the fact that "a chain is as strong as its weakest link."
    Can you imagine what would have happened to your trumpet partner if Charles Mingus or Buddy Rich was the director ?
    Your reference to Chuck "Feel So Good" during his commercial successful days brough to mind his early 70's days when he was a fixture at the "Bottom Line Cabaret" in NYC where his quartet that included Gerry Niewood,Joe Di Bartolo,and Ron Davis turned in some beautiful be-bop music.
    Chuck's rendetion of Freddie Hubbard's "Little SunFlower' is brillant.
    If you don't already have that vinyl,try to get a a copy of his 1972 Mercury Quartet recording,and after listening to it you are guaranteed to cry in your grits or Brunswick stew depending on the time of day you choose to listen.

    Manha De Carnival
     

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