So lets talk metal

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by SteveRicks, Jan 29, 2012.

  1. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    Yes OLDLOU - now that I re-read my post I can see the potential confusion - you have clarified nicely - thanks.
     
  2. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    I've found another interesting reference on the internet, this one from Introduction to Brass - yes it is a UK reference but it deals with recycling brass and may explain some of the properties of available brass stock.

    "The brass industry throughout the world is well organised and equipped to recycle products at the end of their long lives and process scrap (swarf and offcuts). Making brass from new copper and zinc would be uneconomical and wasteful of raw materials so, since new brass articles are made from recycled scrap, brass is said to be sustainable. In the UK brass manufacturers use almost 100% brass scrap."
     
  3. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Not all artillery uses a shell casing. Some use only powder packs and igniters, cannon on ships currently, even historically as far back as the RW in ship and field cannon (earlier I don't have data at hand to cite). My Mother really hated the 2 flower vases made from shell casings that were given to my Father by a close family friend, but they were always present on our dining room fireplace mantle (with renovations, converting to apartments with gas central heat, that fireplace and mantle are now gone.) I sold that pair of vases for $100 unpolished, during the family estate sale. When polished and filled with gladiolas when in bloom in our garden, they didn't look as bad. Still there are avid collectors of such militaria, but I'm not one of them.

    Still, I'd be curious to know if wartime shell / cartridge casings could be smelted and then rolled into sheets from which a brass bell could be made and how the instrument made from such would then sound. I disavow any knowledge of metallurgy. However, with age and origins I do believe such brass would now be replete with lots of impurities.
     
  4. oldlou

    oldlou Forte User

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    That is how such as Henri Selmer were able to manufacture some of the finest brass wind instruments in the modern history of music. Totally from battlefield pickup scrap shell casings.


    OLDLOU>>
     
  5. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Old Lou, Did I not hear that such shell casings used by Selmer were made from seized / confiscated church bells by the Nazis? I'd also think they may have also seized / confiscated the brass pipes from organs and other musical brass instruments as well. Still, my thought is that the church steeple bells are cast of bronze, while there may be smaller bells made of brass, per example hand bells.

    Didn't schools in Germany have pealing bells also cast of bronze? Don't suppose there isn't a process to extract / convert bronze to brass. Whatever, Selmer had made some fine musical instruments, but like others made many as were not so fine viz their association with Bundy.

    Still. I don't think Selmer could actually confirm the source of Nazi brass, thus such being little more than war time legend to the extent of sourcing the brass they used, albeit the seizures / confiscations by the Nazi's are well documented.
     
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2012
  6. veery715

    veery715 Utimate User

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    5"/38 caliber guns utilized by the Navy, and most smaller sizes, featured brass powder cases which loaded separately behind the projectile. The larger guns had sacks of powder instead, which were used most often in multiples, where a filled brass casing would have been too large and heavy for handling.

    We use to snag an occasional empty powder case after the guns were fired, and shipmates made belt buckles and similar items from them.
     

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