Socially Acceptable Spit Release

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by gmonady, Jan 1, 2014.

  1. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    I had mistletoe once, but I got better. My doctor said something about high Gene. The next time I saw Gene I dumped my spit on him and told him to stop getting high.
     
  2. NFS_87

    NFS_87 Pianissimo User

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    I went into this wondering what I would do to appease the non-brass playing world, but now I have another question. How do you play the trumpet and talk to people at the same time? :dontknow:

    As to the original question, handkerchief in my pocket to cup the water valve when I empty it would seem to be a good choice to me.
     
  3. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

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    Haven't read through this tread as it is long, but looking at the title made me wonder how long before the hygenic craze hit the trumpet world. Will OSHA soon be declaring we must hook spit valve collection cups to the horns. And, the EPA will probably be concerned about evaporation so we will have to install evaporative collectors on those. Otherwise, we may be contaminating everyone in the room. Or maybe someone will invent a mouthpiece that removes the saliva.

    Being older, I still use the term spit valve. However, the term "water key" does help the perception with the public. In fact, from what I've read, it might even be the better term as the majority of the liquid is supposed to be water caper that condensed in the horn - not saliva. That might make a neat research experiment- determining how much saliva vs condensed water vapor actually passes out of the horn.
     
  4. PiGuy_314

    PiGuy_314 Pianissimo User

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    The reason I say water key instead of spit valve is not really so much because of the condensation versus saliva issue--it's because as I understand, it is not technically a valve. It is a key. Thus, water key.
    ~Noah
     
  5. bumblebee

    bumblebee Fortissimo User

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    Clever etymologists may chime in to correct me, but I usually think of keys as things which open locks, or in other special cases like typewriter keys or piano keys (which probably have the same base meaning). A valve alters the flow of something - a gate valve restricts or allows flow, other valves behave as junctions. This feels more aligned to the spit valve (or spit key) to me, though I would be happy enough with either designation.

    Perhaps you could say the spit valve has an actuator key?

    --bumblebee
     
  6. Pinstriper

    Pinstriper Mezzo Forte User

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    Spit key.

    Spit key. Spit key. Spit key. Spit key.

    That's fun to say. Spit key.
     
  7. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Nah! With all the bacterial and fungal growth within the tubing of the horn... it's pretty much spit.
     
  8. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Sounds like a deli chain we have in the area.
     
  9. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    "Water Valve" doesn't feel right. I'm voting for "Spit Valve" except for Getzens with an "Amado Water Key." Classy horns, those Getzens.
     
  10. Kujo20

    Kujo20 Forte User

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    I've just always tried being discreet about it. Instead of blowing loudly through the horn and rocking the horn up and down to empty the spit, I just open the valve and let it fall out.

    My playing is mainly done in my own home, church, or a blues club. Each has it's own level of "discreetness". Especially church...!

    Kujo
     

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