Soft palette blisters

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by GB in Japan, Mar 17, 2010.

  1. GB in Japan

    GB in Japan New Friend

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    Feb 21, 2010
    Hi,
    This is the second time it's happened in as many months. Just after playing the trumpet I have something to eat and a blood blister forms on my soft pallette, which just gets bigger and bigger until it bursts - really bloody, yuk, and painful.
    This time I've rinsed my mouth out with antiseptic, so should be okay.

    My questions is - does this happen to anyone else? is it caused by trumpet playing or something completely different, and should I go to the doctors?

    The doctors is a good option but I'm in Japan and so have problems with the language. So, if it's common amongst trumpet players, I'll leave it as it is.

    What's your prognosis "doctors"?
     
  2. Cornyandy

    Cornyandy Fortissimo User

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    Hi GB

    I don't want to sound the alarm but I've never heard of this as a trumpet problem (others can and will correct me if I'm wrong). If I push my top end too much and forget my breathing (which I don't do as much as when I was a lot younger) I used to get a bit "catchy in the back of my throat. Just a silly thought could it have anything to do with the food itself? maybe a food intolerance or allergy. Unless anyone can come up with something better as an idea I think it might be worth a trip to the local doc.

    Hope you get sorted an that it's nothing serious

    Cheers

    Andrew
     
  3. Fluffy615

    Fluffy615 Piano User

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    GB,
    As it turns out, I'm just getting over a similar situation. I ate pizza that was a little too hot and burned the roof of my mouth. That turned into an ulceration during the next week. Could you be eating something too hot as I did?
    I used warm water with aspirin dissolved in it as a moutwash. I also rinsied my mouth with my favorite whiskey. It burns, but it cleans it out an numbs it for awhile. I hope this helps a little.
    Bob
     
  4. GB in Japan

    GB in Japan New Friend

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    Feb 21, 2010
    Whisky sounds like a good option. Thanking you both.
    Looks like a trip to the docs tomorrow morning.
     
  5. Cornyandy

    Cornyandy Fortissimo User

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    Hey guys Whisky is always a good idea, as long as its from Scotland

    Good luck GB

    Andrew
     
  6. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Didn't anyone notice the difference in spelling of "whisky" and "whiskey"? Yep, "whisky: is Scotch and "whiskey" is the other stuff!
     
  7. Cornyandy

    Cornyandy Fortissimo User

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    Yep I noticed hence the qualification,

    A
     
  8. Fluffy615

    Fluffy615 Piano User

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    Actually I was referring to Jack Daniels sour mash whiskey. It's my favorite.
     
  9. Cornyandy

    Cornyandy Fortissimo User

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    Never mind you'll learn to love the real thing one day. I once had a 21 year old cask strength unfiltered Glenlivet MMMMMMM MMMMMMonetteMMMM

    Andrew
     
  10. MTROSTER

    MTROSTER Piano User

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    Back to the problem at hand(it seems to have been diverted to a discussion of the merits of different whiskies; I prefer The Maccallan 12 year old myself). If the blisters are blood filled, I would bet on it being mechanical in nature rather than and allergic nature or some of the other really horrible diseases that you can be afflicted with(sucjh as pemphigus). There is probably something wrong with your technique. Now back the whisky problem.......:roll:

    Dr. Mike
     

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