Soft playing

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by tpter1, Nov 15, 2006.

  1. tpter1

    tpter1 Forte User

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    This is inspired by the loud practicing thread on Wilmer's forum. It came about that good, full and well-controlled volume is the result of well-controlled soft playing.

    Maybe some of you here could help clarify a few of the things I saw on Alex's site about the "They" and "Thaw" attack method taught by Sam Krauss (particularly those whom have studied with him?).

    Also, any methods you use to develop further control and quickness of response at soft dynamic levels like the opening of Oberon or the soft attack needed to sneak in for the lyric solo in Don Juan would be appreciated.
     
  2. trumpetnick

    trumpetnick Fortissimo User

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    I always found easier to play in soft dinamics than to achieve well controlled (as far as intonation and articualtion is concerned) ff...For soft attacks I use often pou or no attack (I was enlighted in this by maurice andre and rod franks, they both asked to to do so for some special cases like the beginning of the 2nd mvt of the Hummel Trumpet Concerto and this Don Juan thing that you mentioned) and it works usually works fine for me (below the staff this may be risky). This is not applicable if you want a very clear tou like attack. I heard also Hakan Hardenberger speaking about this kind of attack (pou). He said on a masterclass that he was practicing the extreme cases (hard attack and pou or no attack) and anything in between was supposed to work fine without speacial further exercises.
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I was taught they and thaw here in Germany. It is basically tonguing between your teeth - something my teachers in the 60's and 70's in America absolutely ruled out. For me, it allows a very precise attack even when playing very softly.
    Many people resort to a breath attack because the soft tonguing is not well enough developed. Trombone players need a soft attack when playing legato - it is possible for us trumpet players too!
     
  4. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Think color and pitch, Glenn. There's no need to "sneak in" during what I call the "Ave Maria" solo (an ironic title based on the first few notes and their similarity to Schubert's 'Ave Maria'), the orchestra is plenty loud and you can play a nice mezzo-forte.

    For the Weber, take a nice two beat (two eighth notes) beat before you play, not one and and don't stop breathing before you sound the note. As you're breathing in think color and pitch.

    ML
     
  5. trumpetmike

    trumpetmike Forte User

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    I use the breath attack quite a bit, for many of the softer pieces in the repertoire. If you can start a note cleanly using only the air, this can be a very effective articulation tool to add to the armoury. I find that it also means that when you are using the tongue you end up with a cleaner start - air and tongue in perfect harmony.

    I have never knowingly used a "th" attack, but I have used T, D and L starts, alongside the breath attack. Each is useful, as are the subtleties in between.
     
  6. adohanian

    adohanian Pianissimo User

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    I've found that when I feel like I have to "sneak in" I usually screw up the entrance and if I can get past that feeling I usually have more success. I know it dosen't help with your syllable question, but if you feel the same way it could be a contributing factor.

    adam
     
  7. trumpetnick

    trumpetnick Fortissimo User

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    TrumpetMike,

    What is the L attack about? Seems I never heard of that one, though I probably may do things whic can be similar.
     
  8. trumpetmike

    trumpetmike Forte User

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    Not sure how to describe it aside from thinking "la"
    I have never been taught it, it was just something I found myself doing in a very legato passage.
     

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