soft playing

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by wrigrn, Jun 4, 2011.

  1. wrigrn

    wrigrn New Friend

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    May 18, 2011
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    Hello from wrigrn, a new member ! I posted a message when I joined, but I would like some advice on soft playing in the Clarke Technical Studies (especially the First Study that I started using as a warm up aid in trying to get my chops back in shape after an 8 year lay off.) I used a daily routine for many years, but things don't feel exactly right yet. So I thought I would lay off my routine a while and depend solely on the soft playing in the Clarke book and work up gradually. Any and all advice would be most welcomed . Thanks in advance, wrigrn
     
  2. dsr0057

    dsr0057 Pianissimo User

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    Dec 20, 2009
    Denton, TX
    Soft playing is hard. Have you considered starting at say a mezzo-forte and working down to a pianissimo? It might be a little easier because you have to maintain the concept of using the same air. I know I can't pick up the horn right away and play something super soft. I have to be fully warmed up and be focused.
     
  3. Branson

    Branson Piano User

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    Jan 16, 2011
    I have found that I need three practice routines for I get bored after a few weeks of the same one. Each of the three have contrasting material. One centers on range, one on tone and the third on flexibility. By changing off when I get bored, I keep all the basses covered.
     
  4. wrigrn

    wrigrn New Friend

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    I guess what I'm really wanting to know is if the first study of the Clarke Tech Studies is proper for the first thing to do in the warm up. I had never done them for that reason before, but just thought it would be the right thing to do in trying to get my chops back in shape after an 8 yr lay off. Although I had used the Clarke book extensively during my playing years, I still can't get past the last 4 or 5 lines yet at the soft level. I probably could if I put the pedal to the metal, but don't want to chance diminishing results.
     
  5. Satchmo Brecker

    Satchmo Brecker Piano User

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    Jul 19, 2010
    I'm a comeback player too (from another instrument though) and something I've picked up from TM and from other pros on other instruments, is this: just play! We're not made of glass, where the slightest misstep will lead to ruin. Sure warm up a bit, sure don't spend 8 hrs a day doing nothing but lip trills, but also don't worry so much about every little thing. Just play play play, mix it up, do alot of listening, have fun.

    I watched a video clip of a master class Michael Brecker gave at North Texas (I think that's the place) several years ago. (If you don't know who he is, IMHO he's the greatest jazz player ever in terms of complete mastery of his horn, any instrument). The students were asking him all kinds of questions about his reeds, how he practiced, which scales, warmups, etc. His answer...I don't know I just make up licks and practice them in every key, maybe do this, do that, never really took alot of lessons. I could almost sense the teachers jaw dropping.
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Is your present routine so crappy that you are willing to throw everything away?

    I would think that ADDING Clarke would a great thing. I am more for evolution than revolution unless we have a desaster that has been carefully ANALysed.
     
  7. wrigrn

    wrigrn New Friend

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    No, the routine is great : long tones, lip slurs, scales from Arban's and interval studies from part II of St. Jacome's . I'm just a little concerned that I shouldn't be so tired at the end of the routine. I rest as much as I play, so I'm just testing myself to be sure that I'm not forcing to get results.
     
  8. jiarby

    jiarby Fortissimo User

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    May 7, 2011
    Arizona
    I'd suggest getting a local teacher or mentor... a fresh set of ears/eyes may give you the right feedback. The forum is great but not the place to get such personalized playing advice.

    I personally start with james stamp long tones as long as it takes to start feeling the buzz... then I do some flexibility slurs, arpeggios through all the keys to stretch the range. After that it is clarke, irons, & arban characteristic etudes. THEN I feel ready to work on whatever I need to do. Some days it is range & endurance, some days it is tounging, whatever I feel like.

    What works for me may not work for you!

    I spend all day in my home office and can play 5-10 minutes at a time 4-5 times an hour all day. At the end of the day I can have 2-3 hrs in.
     
  9. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    I would hang in there and keep it steady. long soft tones helped me, but after many months of "comeback" playing. I took 7 years off, so it is similiar. I mention in some of my posts about 3 hour practices (that is with as much time resting as playing) -- BUT it took a good 6 months to work up to that. and long soft didn't happen overnight.
    we - as trumpet players hearing someone play well, or reading some posts think this stuff happens overnight.
    BUT I assure you that if you keep the practices going-- and look into (record yourself) progress in bi-weekly intervals or monthly --- IF YOU SEE NO PROGRESS THEN -- maybe that is the time to start worrying.
    play and be happy:thumbsup:
     
  10. wrigrn

    wrigrn New Friend

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    I used to play the long tone exercises from the Daily Embouchure Drills and Exercises by Edwin Franco Goldman; they went from low c down to low f# and back up to low c, 12 counts each note cresc/decresc with a 4 count rest between each note. Then low c to 3rd space c, then 3rd space c to high c. Each segment ended with the instruction : rest a few minutes. Are these anything like the Stamps long tones? I'm not familiar with the Stamps ; probably because I'm and old geezer (ha)
     

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