Soldering Water Key

Discussion in 'Trumpet Repair and Modification' started by BrassBandMajor, May 16, 2015.

  1. BrassBandMajor

    BrassBandMajor Fortissimo User

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    So yeah I found a cornet and everything is marvellous except for the water key.
    the whole part is seperated.
    Can some tell me how to re solder this on??
    I'm thinking of using a bbq lighter and some solder wire.
    Here's a photo
    [​IMG]
     
  2. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    You only need to clean both surfaces, apply flux, hold the items in place, heat to above the melting point of the solder and offer some solder into the joint.

    Oh, and read the disclaimer in my signature........
     
  3. Culbe

    Culbe Forte User

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    If you would take off the spring and the lever, you wouldn't have to fight them to get the key in position to solder.
     
  4. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    Just a quick question for the OP - on which part are you intending to concentrate the heat? If you are at all doubtful about the answer - get a professional - trust me, it'll be cheaper.
     
  5. stumac

    stumac Fortissimo User

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    Your cornet looks in too good condition to try a do it yourself repair until you have learned soldering skills, have a professional do it, it will not be an expensive job, on a lacquered horn it is very difficult to solder without burning the lacquer and making an unslightly mess. Have a look at the youtube videos of trumpet manufacture to get an idea of what is involved.

    Regards, Stuart.
     
  6. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    It looks very much like cellulose lacquer rather than epoxy - it will burn black as soon as it sees you lighting the torch.
     
  7. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    You need the lever (but not the spring) to be in place to accurately position the parts.
     
  8. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    Why are we all spending time on answering this? It is a $15 repair plus a couple of bucks for new spring and cork!
     
  9. Bochawa!!!

    Bochawa!!! Forte User

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    There is a certain element out there hell bent to do things themselves (not mentioning any names, cough, cough, Bochawa!!!:oops:).

    If you use a butane torch it might not burn the lacquer, but then again it might as Ivan said above. Don't waste your time with a lighter. It won't generate a hot enough flame. Unless you plan to do a lot of solder repairs it's not worth buying the torch.
     
  10. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

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    Agreed with Bochawa. There are some of us that just have an inner drive to do some of this ourselves. I love watching repairs at our local shop/large music store made by the elderly owner and best repairman (engineer) for 1000 miles. We have gotten to be friends over the last couple years. At one point he taught repair classes at the universities nearby. He keeps offering to teach me if I would come work for him (for around minimum wage from what I hear from the other workers). I hold a government job (appointed) with lots of responsibility that demands about 70+ hours a week or else I might consider it. Anyway, there is just something about being able to do a repair yourself that is enjoyable. No threat to the real pros any more than my playing trumpet as a hobby is going to threaten Wayne Bergeron.

    By the way, all of my repairs thus far have been successful other than freeing a stuck tuning slide (they have a double slide area for adjusting from Bb to A) on an early King Liberty. Did all of the tricks from penetrating oil for over a month to heating, oil, tapping every day, etc. After a couple of months using a wood block on the inside of the tuning curve I was so frustrated that I dented in the curve somewhat. Have decided it is not coming loose. Fabulous playing horn however (my main practice horn at home).
     

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