Some Tinny Notes

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Mark_Kindy, Apr 12, 2012.

  1. Local 357

    Local 357 Banned

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    A trumpet player tends to sound best on the mouthpiece he can SUPPORT. Granted a second line G doesn't need a heck of a lot of support. Very "little energy demand" to use Maynard's words.

    That said I've noticed (and this probably doesn't relate all that much to the topic or condition):


    Trumpet players who use large mouthpieces but don't play or practice long hours usually sound MUCH better after they switch to shallower/smaller mouthpieces. This ought to EXCLUDE Mark K.


    Unless a trumpet section is fairly powerful they will always sound better and create a more sonorous sectional tone when using something more around a Bach 7 to 10C (Gawd i HATE mentioning Bach mouthpieces in any kind of positive sense. i offer these thoughts only as a measure of mouthpiece size.


    Sometimes I feel like going out and buying the trumpet playing associates in the local community college band a collection of Schilke "A" and "B" cup mouthpieces. But I think I'll save my money and get my whole Al Cass collection cloned. Better mouthpieces.
     
  2. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    don't worry Mark --- local doesn't approve of my mpc selection either --- but that is the mpc, I use, practice on, and play almost everything on --- and one in which I can support sound with ----- and sometimes that is all that matters ---- the sound.
     
  3. Mark_Kindy

    Mark_Kindy Mezzo Forte User

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    I don't have a particular love of Bachs, but of course I won't knock them -- plenty of players use them, I don't have an issue with them, I'll use what I can get a hold of that works.
    Like Local mentioned, it doesn't require too much effort to support 2nd line G, so that doesn't seem to be the problem. Perhaps an octave up, that may be something that would be more of an issue.
    I notice that the tinniness has seemed to have disappeared... I think it may have just been the way I was hearing myself, but thank you all for the help. I think relaxation of the lip also was another possibility.
    I'll look into a leak as a possibility, as well.. never know when I'm imagining it's there, or perhaps when it's not.

    Thanks all!
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2012
  4. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Rowuk, that's a great link. Book marked it a couple years ago (and now with google translator, I can figure out the German). I would second what you initially mentioned, long tones. Not many do long tones above the staff. I started a couple years ago when I read a VB post about picking your note. Other teachers I've read say similar. When I started, 6 seconds wasn't very long! :-) Now I can hold it for 45-60 seconds. Crescendo/Decrescendo/Crescendo/Decrescendo, you get the point. try to vary it up as much as you can. It is a boring exercise but it has to be done.
     
  5. sirspinbad

    sirspinbad Pianissimo User

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    ..that's why I have so many trumpets..so I can never blame the equipment!
     
  6. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Just keep playing your G over and over and over again stringing the notes together and enjoy. My moto is... There is nothing wrong with a tiny G string.
     
  7. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Put away the tinny toy trumpet and play a regular brass one. I was compelled to say this, as such was once told me by a physician when I was 5 years old and then had a toy tin trumpet. That Doc died before I actually began playing a brass one.
     
  8. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    Does your teacher hear a difference? Is the G tinny on another horn?. You may have an obstuction - dirt - something in the horn. Try a complete cleaning and visual inspection. Are your valves lined up correctly? Play the G and press your water key closed. All the notes on a trumpet should sound the same.
     
  9. Mark_Kindy

    Mark_Kindy Mezzo Forte User

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    Haven't gotten to see my teacher since then, but as far as I'm aware, she hadn't heard anything prior. The G is not tinny on my Edwards (love that horn!)
    The valves I had aligned a few months back, so they should be good, and the water key is clear. I'll check the rest, thanks!
     

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