Songs of a Wayfarer

Discussion in 'Orchestra / Solo / Chamber Music' started by trumpetdon, Jan 12, 2005.

  1. trumpetdon

    trumpetdon New Friend

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    Jan 12, 2005
    I posted this earlier but it got lost when the system went down, so here goes again...

    Hi Manny,

    I am looking for suggestions on contrasting the "gestopft" and "dampfer" passages in "Songs of a Wayfarer" and other works of Mahler.

    What a beautiful piece! I am really looking forward to performing it this week.

    Is it standard practice to use a a hand stop for the "gestopft?" The recordings I have heard sound muted. It appears that Mahler uses "gestopft" when the time to switch to or from open is too short. But if one can manage the mute change, should you go with that?

    Also, in the 2nd movement, the theme (later used in Symphony #1) that goes (concert pitch) B, F#, B, C#, D#, E, F#, is marked "offen" on the prior passage, with no change marked on this passage, but the recordings I have heard are muted here. Is this common practice?

    I plan on using my Lechner C trumpet.

    Thanks for your help.
    Don
     
  2. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Sep 29, 2004
    USA
    "Is it standard practice to use a a hand stop for the "gestopft?" The recordings I have heard sound muted. It appears that Mahler uses "gestopft" when the time to switch to or from open is too short. But if one can manage the mute change, should you go with that?

    Remember that in the days of Mahler the horn of choice when he wrote the First symphony was the F trumpet, a large instrument with a large bell. To insert your hand into the bell to get that unique sound was a different story than what we have available today. Feel free to use a mute wherever "gestopft" is indicated.

    "Also, in the 2nd movement, the theme (later used in Symphony #1) that goes (concert pitch) B, F#, B, C#, D#, E, F#, is marked "offen" on the prior passage, with no change marked on this passage, but the recordings I have heard are muted here. Is this common practice?"

    I can't think of a single justification other than the trumpeter not being able to play softly enough. Play it open. Enjoy!

    ML
     
  3. trumpetdon

    trumpetdon New Friend

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    Jan 12, 2005
    Thanks Manny,
    Your information is just what I need.
    I'll plan on using a mute then on the "stopped" passages. The theme I qouted is so beautiful played softly open, it went great that way in rehearsal, so that's what I'll do there as well.
    Don
     

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