"Sorry. I'm breaking in a new pair of lips!"

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Bochawa!!!, Jan 26, 2014.

  1. macjack

    macjack New Friend

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    Floss, brush, eat healthy, and see your dentist routinely for cleanings and exams. Preventive care really works! Without back teeth, the front ones get overloaded and may fail.
     
  2. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    My brother is a dentist. He is also a trumpet player. He too knows how to maintain tooth health to maintain playing integrity, and I see him regularly for preventive visits. So I agree completely with the above post.

    I also recall chipping a back molar on a Friday. The next day, Saturday evening, I was to play a gig at the Jazz Cafe in Detroit (actually Solar Bell attended that gig). So my brother worked me in that Saturday morning, and I pleaded with him NOT to numb me as I did not want my lip feeling funny later that evening. He said he thought he could do that. All I felt was a bit of warmth with a tool he used, saw him shove a real long sharp tool in then heard scrapping but felt nothing, then he worked another tool, felt nothing, heard nothing, and said, "All I need to do is shine a light on that tooth, and you're all done." AMAZING!!! It felt just like the tooth I had before the chip. Played that same night and was one of the best gigs I can remember (that was the first night I played my newly acquired Martin Committee in public). But I am biased. Only Solar Bell can say if the dental work did well that night.
     
  3. barliman2001

    barliman2001 Fortissimo User

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    Well OP, the most famous trumpet player who had similar problems passed away and cannot be asked: Maurice André.
     
  4. harleyt26

    harleyt26 Mezzo Forte User

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    Finally! The last permanent crown is in. Now to start with the process of the partial / bridge. It sounds like there will be a metal piece that will cross the roof of my mouth. How will that affect playing trumpet? I have a very strong gag reflex, this may be hard to get used to. Sounds like it will take two or three months to complete the process. Maybe much longer to adjust my playing to it. More than a little worried.
     
  5. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Dayton, Ohio
    As a physician, let me test your gag reflex online just to find out how sensitive:

    Did you hear about the two peanuts walking through Central Park?
    One was a salted. [assulted?-get it]

    If you did not find this funny, you have a pretty dull gag reflex.
     
  6. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    .:-)
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2014
  7. harleyt26

    harleyt26 Mezzo Forte User

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    Well I guess my gag reflex is no stronger than my sense of humor.

    But the thought of something semi-permanently across the roof of my mouth at the back of my tongue does result in an immediate twinge of the reflex. It seems this object would be certain to affect some aspects of trumpet playing too, like double tonguing and throat growls.
     
  8. Bochawa!!!

    Bochawa!!! Forte User

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    Best of luck Tom. Keep us updated on your progress.
     
  9. Bochawa!!!

    Bochawa!!! Forte User

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    Well, I'm sitting here looking out my window at a blizzard and recovering from the implant surgery I had yesterday. My top lip is pretty swollen and my daughter says I look like a duck. Kids! A little more than an hour to cut off my old bridge, a little more than an hour to install two titanium implants into my upper jaw, and a little more than an hour to fit a tempory bridge which made for about three and a half hours in the chair. The inserts are pretty cool looking in the xray. They are about 11 mm long and maybe 3 mm wide with a good thread on them. Should be a good anchor and take some of the stress off of the teeth that have been carrying the load of the bridge.

    Healing time is 3 - 4 months and then the four final crowns will be installed. I have decided to just put the horn down until everything is in its permanent position, so I should resume playing in July or August. We found a guy to cover my chair and our band leader wants me to fill in on auxiliary percussion until I can rejoin the section. Depending on how things go I may have to rejoin on chair 4 after 20 years on lead, but we'll see. That's the least of my worries. I use the trumpet extensively to play various parts when I'm teaching my band classes so I'm going to have to figure my way around that one until the new school year. Maybe I'll get good at tranposing the other parts on piano or maybe I'll just sing them. Should be an interesting challenge.
     
  10. harleyt26

    harleyt26 Mezzo Forte User

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    I wish you a smooth and speedy recovery.

    In the meantime you can ship your horn collection south for a sunny vacation in Florida. I will make sure nothing freezes up (pun intended) and keep everything clean and lubed.:cool:
     

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