Sound Concept

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by lakerjazz, Jul 6, 2011.

  1. lakerjazz

    lakerjazz Mezzo Piano User

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    Oct 10, 2006
    One thing that I've noticed about the trumpet is that the sound from player to player seems to vary a lot more than other instruments. I've noticed that over time, there have been four basic sound concepts. One is the standard concert hall sound concept of a full projecting tone, which is used by every classical trumpet player with few exceptions. Another is the bright brassy sound typically found in mariachi bands. The last two are from jazz. One sound concept is that of a fatter, more bulbous tone, and the other is of a more character-like personal sound with high overtones throughout. For example, the fatter tone: YouTube - ‪After You've Gone- James P. Johnson‬‏
    the character-like tone: YouTube - ‪Roy Eldridge - After You've Gone‬‏

    Though the concert sound, mariachi sound, and fat jazz sound prevail, I've yet to find a recording after the 50s that embraces the remaining sound concept. Why? :dontknow: Does anyone have counterexamples?
     
  2. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    New York State USA
    I am not sure what you are looking for, because your going to get a hundred responses to this thread with everyone putting up there favorite performer -- if it is a the character like sound with overtones -- and personalized -------- I can't think of a better one to put up than Phil Driscoll --- having said that -- the dude can play in about any style anyhow -- but here it is -
    it's a duet -- with his son -- so there may be another trumpet player -- "in the making"

    YouTube - ‪PHIL DRISCOLL & his Son INCREDIBLE DUET of Holy Holy Holy‬‏
     
  3. lakerjazz

    lakerjazz Mezzo Piano User

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    Oct 10, 2006
    Yes they are fantastic players, but my question was not in regard to style. Rather, it has to do with how they approach the horn. These players that you've shown also go for the fat commercial sound that I hear so often, and of course, they have their own personality added on. The sound is fat and full, like most commercial trumpet records since the 50s, but you can't say the same for the Roy Eldridge. It is not fat or full, but it is still good quality. Consequently, it is a different but valid approach, one that I don't find in many records since the 50s.
     

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