sound proofing a room ???

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by anthony, Mar 23, 2010.

  1. Matthew Cruice

    Matthew Cruice New Friend

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    Anyone have any additional thoughts on how to effectively soundproof a room? I have become increasingly irritated over the years on anyone hearing me practice, even if I'm playing on a silent brass mute (which can still be heard by family members). I'm at the point now where I flat-out refuse to play my trumpet if anyone else is in the house. That has resulted in a great lack of consistency in my playing, as my total practice time is 100% reliant if anyone is in the house at all. I have even stopped practice sessions cold when I hear someone get home from work.

    I don't have enough money to buy some isolated house somewhere, but I do have $3500 I could spend on soundproofing a room. There is an 8.5 x 12 room out in my garage that is basically just a library right now, so I'm looking at somehow soundproofing that. I just have to have total isolation when I play. If I don't, my trumpet playing days may be numbered, as I hate playing on weak lips.

    Any ideas or any contractors you know of that does this sort of thing?
     
  2. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    I went to a chain retailer to buy a product made out of blue jeans. It goes inside wall and ceiling studs it works great. Its thicker than most materials, very soft and full, and non-irritating to the touch. It has worked great in my home. It cost me about $150 to get enough material to do a room that is 13 x 22 ft. I only sound proofed two internal walls and ceiling (as tow of the walls are part of a secluded concrete slab from the main house structure.
     
  3. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    I think there's a mindset issue here, Matthew.

    Unless someone is kicking up a real stink about you practising while they are in the house, what's the problem?

    There's nearly always someone in the house when I'm practising - as it happens a couple of sister-in-laws extra this weekend - but there is no way I'm going to let this get in the way of my practice. Instead, it is practice with an audience. An extra incentive to work towards making my technical exercises sound good - which is how we want them to be isn't it?

    It's easy enough to explain to them that you practise what you need to practise - basically the stuff that sounds pretty rubbish. So you've set the bar for low expectations. Everything above that is a plus as far as both you and they are concerned.

    And we've heard your recordings. Pretty damn good I'd say. And if you don't mind us - the most hypercritical audience you'll ever have - listening to your efforts, then why worry about the odd few fluffs being heard by those you are close to?

    No just treat them to those unintentional seventh harmonics (but play them with style as if they were intentional);-)
     
  4. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    PS. If you want to make a cheap anechoic chamber, line the walls with cardboard egg cartons.
     
  5. Matthew Cruice

    Matthew Cruice New Friend

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    I don't know, I just find myself more and more wanting no audience whatsoever. I don't mind rehearsals and performances (although my nerves aren't the best), but I need complete freedom to practice whatever, whenever, with no ears but mine present. I already view my professional trumpet playing prospects as dim at the moment, so I need to get that complete isolation for complete freedom and then see where I am after a year or something.
     
  6. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    A small part of my decision to sound proof was to keep people from hearing me, but more important, I sound proofed to keep from hearing the household input. I put in a digital Sonos system and the house is playing music nearly all the waking hours that someone in the household is up and around. I did not want the sound of the music from the upper level to bleed into the music room while I practiced. Sound proofing did accomplish this more important goal, such that when my significant other has the speakers on the upper floor playing Pandora, Music Library material, the TV or Sirus XM, I have no ambient music that leaks into my lower level music room. So my mindset cuts both ways and have a clear mind to let my relative pitch work it's wonders.
     
  7. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    You HAVE to banish this thought from your thinking. Not on the basis of whether it's true or not, but whether it is RELEVANT. We are trumpeters. We are born and bred to make a noise. If for one moment you have any doubt about your inalienable right to make a noise, just think to yourself "Piers Morgan. Who gave him permission?". Nuff said.
     
  8. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    I dunno.

    If we only want ourselves to hear our own playing, I feel that defeats our calling. I can understand not wanting to annoy neighbors, but hey, the trumpet points away from our head for the reason that others can hear us.

    In short, until you can construct your own acoustic space, keep practicing away with the family as audience and more importantly--feedback! "That sounded nice" can do wonders!

    When I moved to Germany, I subjected my land-lady to hours upon hours of practice, and the biggest chunk of that were technical in
    nature. I always finished with a few good Lutheran tunes, and I like to think she took my practice for what it is--an expression of
    joy, like a baby mesmerized by and mastering its limbs, and enjoying the heck out of it. She sang along with the church tunes.
     
  9. Newell Post

    Newell Post Piano User

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    So, I'm an architect in my day job, and I have to deal with building acoustics as part of the package. For a good practice room you need a combination of five things. In layman's terms...

    1. mass
    2. fluff
    3. decoupling
    4. reduction of reflections
    5. elimination of leaks



    1. Mass. In most houses, the cheapest and easiest way of adding mass is to add multiple layers of gypsum drywall board ("GWB"). Mass helps reduce the transmission of low-frequency sound.

    2. Fluff. This usually means adding batt insulation in the stud spaces of walls and ceilings. The building products companies sell batt insulation made of mineral wool that is made for sound attenuation.

    3. Decoupling. The building products companies make resilient (sheet metal) channels that can be attached to the studs. The GWB is then attached to these channels. This reduces the transmission of sound through the solid bridges formed by traditional studs or joists.

    4. Reduction of reflections. Adding acoustical tiles or panels inside the room will reduce the reverberations your hear from sound bouncing around inside your practice room. But the people in other parts of the house won't notice much difference due to the acoustical tile.

    5. Elimination of leaks. Weatherstrip the door and make sure all joints are caulked. Make sure any junction boxes for electrical outlets, light switches, etc. are caulked tight and wrapped with the batt insulation on the outside.

    [​IMG]
     
  10. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Some of you are saying, regardless of how you couch it, that if you play trumpet you must settle for making noise, bothering other listeners. In other words, if you can't live with bothering others, don't play the trumpet. I'm not sure I can go along with that.

    Matthew, you mentioned $3,500.00. Have you considered a Whisper Room? I believe their basic model is around $4,000.00 and it's a lot less trouble than the alternatives.
     

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