sound proofing a room ???

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by anthony, Mar 23, 2010.

  1. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,616
    7,961
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    Although a lot of attention has been focussed on the room, what about the player? If we create a "small" isolated space, what happens to our sound? I can tell you, it becomes small and isolated too! The biggest problem for my best young students is practicing in their bedrooms.

    I think we are dealing with several things here and unless the house has a VERY large room that can be treated (room in room), maybe the $3500 should be donated to a church for practice rights........

    For $3500 you can build a room in a room however. Just make sure that your practice space is big enough. If the room is not square, play to the wall furthest away.

    Here is one example near your price limit:
    DIY: Build Your Own Soundproof Home Studio - DRUM! Magazine - Play Better Faster

    The hardest part of isolation is ventilation. We need fresh air to practice near our potential............. Here is one solution for that.
     
  2. Matthew Cruice

    Matthew Cruice New Friend

    22
    22
    Sep 13, 2015
    The room I would be soundproofing is about 8.5 x 12. It might just be big enough for my purposes. I need enough room to put all my recording equipment in it, as well as enough room to fully get me on camera as well, and I think this room will be just about big enough, although sticking another room in it might make it too small. I want to do this right, but I would like to avoid expanding the room by knocking a wall down. The room is in the corner of a 2 car garage and isn't connected to any other rooms in the house, so there is room to expand the walls if need be.
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,616
    7,961
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    You should be good to go. As it is in a garage, the room in a room is no issue. If the garage has no cellar, then there will be no issues of sound transmission down. Makes the floor a bit easier.

    The secret is air pockets between isolated walls. If I were to do this again, I would watch for used sound isolating windows and make a frame for them to cover as much area as possible. They need minimal depth and do a good job of blocking the frequencies we are talking about. Simple thick curtains then control the acoustics. It should not be too dead.

    I have no "minimum" size. Our ears get less confused when the first major reflection is >20 milliseconds after the original blast. Golden Mean ratio (W/H/D) keeps resonances down. Don't forget enough electrical outlets. They are much more elegant than extension cords. Try to avoid flourescent lighting. It is VERY noisy and when recording guitar or bass, can be prone to spoiling your day. LED is best, followed by halogen.

     
  4. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

    5,332
    4,732
    Aug 7, 2013
    Lagos, Nigeria
    Point taken Mr K.

    But the OP's problem appears to be based around performance anxiety, and this isn't the only current thread touching on the subject.

    One paradox that puzzles me a little about my past is that despite being at times a painfully shy kid, I never suffered from nerves during a performance. Ever. Part of it may have been the ability to focus intently on the music, but I believe that most of it was simply being used to playing with an audience. From the age of 10 onward I was leading the hymns in school morning assemblies and that was a daily audience of close to 2,000 who heard every note, good or bad.

    There are two spirals at work here - a downwards spiral reinforced by fear of failure, and an upwards spiral reinforced by actual success and (the occasional) signs of appreciation from your audience. It's important to ride the second one, and that needs an audience. The more frequent the better.
     
  5. Qwimby1

    Qwimby1 New Friend

    9
    3
    Aug 22, 2013
    I practiced for years with a Harmon mute minus the plunger. I don't mind the sound at all, and when I get to play open horn it's a plus because pushing against the Harmon resistance built really strong abs and gave me great open horn power.
     
  6. Msen

    Msen Piano User

    362
    134
    Dec 28, 2011
    I live in the Horn
    Sound proofing a room costed a friend 15.000Euros = $17.000. But he can now play trumpet at 3 AM.

    I don't like the sound I get in sound proof rooms. I go to parks for practice and save my money.

    Unless you want to get really loud in your personal moments and sound proofing the room for trumpet playing is just an excuse I suggest the same :)))
     
  7. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

    18,128
    9,302
    Jan 28, 2011
    Dayton, Ohio
    Put your opened case in front of you while playing in the park, and you could be MAKING money!
     
  8. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

    18,128
    9,302
    Jan 28, 2011
    Dayton, Ohio
    Maybe, if you are doing crunches while playing. I have used the harmon mute for 40 years and my waist line continued to expand. Over the past 3 months, I have been doing abdominal crunches in 5 different sets and my abs are really toning now! So it takes a bit more to get those abs toned. I do feel toning up has improved my playing as well.
     

Share This Page