Sounding Taps

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Ed Lee, Dec 18, 2015.

  1. TugValleyTrumpeter

    TugValleyTrumpeter New Friend

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    Dec 8, 2015
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    I too have had issues with the electronic bugle. One of the local VFW posts has one and they have told me they prefer it to a real player. I played at my uncle's funeral because the family requested it, but the guys from the VFW didn't seem to like that they didn't get to use the electronic bugle. It is a shame that it has become a replacement for a live player.
     
  2. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    There have been quite a few times I've heard TAPS sounded live at Arlington National Cemetery as part of the entourage. More as I traveled along the Potomac River.

    When I too was a Boy Scout, with a note from my parents I was released from school to sound Taps at a funeral. I then rode in the funeral home flower truck as arrives about a half hour or more before the hearse. Once I sounded Taps from the bell tower of the church for an interment in the church yard. That was scary climbing the narrow stairs and then to stand there among three bells.

    I've also sung and played hymns with accompaniment at many funerals, the latter most recently for our next door neighbor. As a Member of the St. Andrews Society I've heard the Pipes and a few times sounded Taps at funerals then also.

    During the past 2 years, the Baptist Church minister has played my multi-brass CD of Christ The Lord Is Risen Today over the church exterior speakers as a call to worship at the joint Baptist - Methodist sunrise service. I've recently produced a new multi brass CD recording of O Come, All Ye Faithful that he says he'll play on the speakers again as a call to worship at the joint Cantata this year on Christmas Eve. This year it will be hosted by the Baptist church, as alternates annually with the next door Methodist church. The Town of Jackson is only 10 miles square and music on these speakers can be heard about all over town about equal to the emergency siren, the latter as is tested every Monday at 7:00 PM local time.

    Yes, already since I posted notices that I no longer will offer to sound TAPS I'm receiving phone calls, 2 so far as have been flak but only that it is a travesty that I won't any longer. Those that now know me and my ability express their sorrow.

    My sorrow is the appearance of the Northampton County High School Band in the Town of Jackson Christmas parade on Saturday, December 12, 2015. I didn't hear them as they past me, and I've been told by others that when they did there were several sour notes, but IMO their rag tag appearance was a disgrace. Well, then also the Junior ROTC had several out of step also.

    The open group I play with on Wednesday evenings, The Cleffers, is on holiday hiatus until January 13, 2016. Tonight, with a core ensemble of them I'll be playing at the Senior Center while the seniors have supper. More than half of the Cleffers are beyond 50 yo themselves, a few even in wheelchairs too.
     
  3. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    I applaud those of you who play for burial services. I too was a Bugler Merit Badged Boy Scout and I also was a military trumpeter for four years. I hate funerals. Won't go within a hundred miles of one. And if I have to be at one, I avoid looking towards an open casket. The only funeral I've played for was when I was in the military and played a memorial service when President/General Eisenhower was buried. But that's me, and one of the reasons I regard those of you who do play these services.

    But I don't read the OP as about services or about how the bugle calls are produced. I read it as a notice of Ed's conditions and Ed, you have all my sympathy. I have the impression that you are one of those who can look on their life and say, "I gave it all my best."

    Although I'm lucky to be able to continue playing (trumpet, Horn), I also have had to give up playing in a sense, and really sympathize with you. Before I left Germany, I was playing lead alto and solo tenor (saxes) in big bands, principal alto in a concert wind ensemble, and saxes and flutes in pop bands. Additionally, I had a private teaching studio. I was playing all the time. But when I returned to the States, it all soon came to a screeching halt due mainly to health problems. In about three years, I've had two back and neck operations and a lung operation and other problems that interfered with my playing. In a five year period, I lost two years of accumulated time from playing. And it hurts.

    So, I feel deeply for you. I think I can speak for all of us when I wish you well and know that we will be keeping you in our hearts and prayers.
     
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  4. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    I would like to thank you all for your comments, and ask that now we let this thread "REST". My regret is that for more than half my life I did not play when I physically could have, had my life circumstances been different.
     
  5. barliman2001

    barliman2001 Fortissimo User

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    So it is quite in order that we conclude with the German version of laying a comrade to rest - "Ich hatt' einen Kameraden", here played at the official ceremonies remembering the resistance involved on 20 July, 1944.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8jtV9p7gKBo
     
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  6. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Did that with one of my bands in Germany each year at a monument in the town I lived in (my wife's home town).
    (Of course, it was not for the resistance fighters, though, but it was for all fallen, including WWI.)
     
  7. barliman2001

    barliman2001 Fortissimo User

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    You mean "Volkstrauertag", usually the first gig in every year where you're playing outside in either pouring rain or in sleet and snow. On one occasion, we had to stop because all the valved instruments were frozen in by the time the official speeches were over and we were supposed to play...
     
  8. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Yeah. I did a Weinachtsmarkt in Germany with one of my bands that we finally had to give up on when the flautists were pulling ice cylinders out of their instruments, and the saxes literally had icicles hanging out of their tone holes. That was one brutal night! :-/

    Volkstrauertag wasn't usually that bad. Just some years were a little more overcast, chilly and rainy than others.
    (Gad - I miss Germany, but not the weather.)
     
  9. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Peter, I have a Brit bugle (and another one made in India, which need not be used other than as a noisemaker) but I disagree on the Brit being heard better than a Bb trumpet. Arlington National Cemetery buglers now use a Bb valveless field trumpet. When I lived in Oxon Hill and Fort Washington MD and when the winds were right I could faintly hear the buglers at ANC more than 10 miles away. Both my homes were within a mile of the Potomac River and only about 500 feet above it. True, then my hearing was a lot better then than presently. Since moving to NC, distance has not been an issue, and I really prefer my US Regulation in G marketed by Slingerland, the U.S. Regulation as was used by US through WWII and part of the Korean Conflict, I've always felt it has a more subdued and appropriate tone quality. Too, the US Boy Scouts use a U.S. Regulation, as is what I learned on, but such didn't help when the very next year I began to try playing a French horn, and thankfully that ended quick when I bought a pre-owned trumpet.

    In an aside, I believe instrumental music instructors wanting French horn players should be seeking those who are dominant left handed noting those that write so or wear wrist watches on right hand.
     
  10. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Ed, using that logic, how would you handle all woodwind players who use both hands?
     

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