Soundproofing materials?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by turtlejimmy, Nov 24, 2010.

  1. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    My cousin owns a recording studio where I live that is the size of a barn (it's a converted barn). He's in the process of upgrading his digital recording with thousands of $ of gear, Mac computer, interfaces, etc.

    He also plans on building a recording booth inside the studio, where the engineer can sit. After he described the booth, I told him I wanted one in my practice room for trumpet .... playing inside one of these booths would render your practice unhearable outside the booth, generally speaking. You could practice 24/7. With impunity. You could laugh at your sleeping neighbors.

    So ...... the bad news is that, according to Richard, those sound proofing materials are EXPENSIVE. No, egg cartons and any number of other home sound proofing remedies will not work, so he says. The carpentry work is easy and not expensive but the actual heavy and dense foam material makes his expected expense for this booth--where he can be isolated from the recording, which he hasn't had before--is several thousand dollars. If he tried to find one that was pre-built, especially for recording studios, it would cost more.

    :shhh:


    Any thoughts anyone on how to make one of these "sound isolation booths" with cheaper materials that would also work??? Let's just say, for argument's sake, that there has to be one window, so it doesn't feel like a "sensory deprivation tank."

    I encountered this when I was a drummer in college. I'm just leading a loud life, I guess. I moved several times, at the request of my neighbors/landlords, until I found the ideal place. A garage that had been soundproofed by the former owners, for their rock and roll band. I rented the garage, and could play full tilt in there anytime day or night ..... outside, standing next to the door, you could barely tell somebody was inside, playing. Honestly, I wish now that I had looked into seeing how it was done and with what materials.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated. I want a booth.:play:

    Turtle
     
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2010
  2. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    Maxwell Smart had a Cone of Silence ROFL
     
  3. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    ROFL


    I'm not a secret agent, just a regular guy .....:lol:


    Turtle
     
  4. govtmodel

    govtmodel Pianissimo User

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  5. veery715

    veery715 Utimate User

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    No ideas for you, but tell your cousin not to forget the floor. Vibrations from the street or road outside can enter from underneath. One solution is to float it on sand.
     
  6. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Thanks Richard!

    I notice that their panels have sound absorption ratings. I'll pass that website along to my cousin. We may be able to save between us by buying for two booths. His will undoubtedly be larger ... I'd think he would want to be able to be in there with a client, so they can talk while recording is going on outside. I could probably get by with half that amount of space. I was thinking I'd want to build mine with bolts instead of nails, so I could take it apart and move it.

    Turtle
     
  7. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Thanks, Veery. The barn's on a farm and the closest road isn't even paved. He did this before with his old recording studio, building a booth, which was on a road. I think the road is one of the reasons he moved.:lol:

    Turtle
     
  8. jbkirby

    jbkirby Forte User

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    I've never tried this, but look for convoluted foam, such as a mattress overlay. These or a similar convoluted foam product could be used to soundproof a room, but be aware of flammability and fire hazards.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. oldgit

    oldgit Pianissimo User

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    sound absorbsion is the key, layers and air gaps with some movement of the insulating layer. Unless you can affort the expensive stuff.
    high dencity plasterboard and building grade rockwool insulation in a triple sandwich should do the trick, eg platerboard-rockwoll-plasterboard-rockwool-plasterboard. the window could act as a drum so again independent layers.
    dont forget ventilation or you could get warm and breath less!
    this is more for you at home a professional set up is just that professional.
    let us know how you get on.
     
  10. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    I definitely want to watch my fire-hazardness, and keep it as low as possible.

    While my cousin needs more perfect sound proofing, I could get away with less. His advantage is that he already has an area in mind, that has an overhang, where there's a large loft. He's going to build it right into that spot, so he only needs one wall ..... essentially the ceiling is already in. Most of his expense is going to be those recording studio grade panels of sound absorption material, I think they're 4 x 8 foot. Sadly, I missed a recording studio going out of business sale where they were selling off huge items, like these 4 x 8 panels.

    For me, I had thought of a free standing "booth", that could be put on carpet or whatever's on the floor, bolted together so it would be easily movable. I could put off, you know, ... the next couple of trumpets I was thinking of buying. Could be a good temporary cure for N+1.:dontknow:

    Turtle
     

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