Soundproofing materials?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by turtlejimmy, Nov 24, 2010.

  1. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Wow, that's great! Thanks Ted.

    If this practice booth works out, I'm going to call it the Smart Cone Mute, after Maxwell Smart's cone of silence. "Step inside the cone mute ... if you need to make a call, use the shoe phone."

    Turtle
     
  2. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    After I had a chance to read the material ... needed to pull out the old Sherlock Holmes magnifying glass to do it ... I have to say, bloody good stuff that. "An Acoustics Primer" is so good, I printed out a couple of copies, one to give to my cousin. Of course, he may already know all of that but I sure didn't.

    Ted, you rock!

    Turtle
     
  3. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    Hey Turtle - the power of Google, eh?
     
  4. Peter McNeill

    Peter McNeill Utimate User

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  5. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Peter,

    That ebay booth looks interesting .......... I noticed that it is LOCAL PICKUP ONLY, however, there is NO CLUE ABOUT WHERE IT IS.

    ROFL


    Turtle

    I tried the ebay listing again and this time the location came up .... Texas. I suppose I'd have to figure in gas and other expenses to go get it. Looks interesting but it's no Smart Cone Mute.:noway:
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2010
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    before making a decision on what to do, you need a clear picture of what the problem is.

    What ambient noise do you have? For a recording booth the problem isn't what is in the booth, it is what is OUTSIDE that can get in and muck up the recording. You can add all of the soundproofing that you want inside - it will not appreciably damp external noise.

    If you need to isolate from VERY low frequencies (planes, trains, earthquakes) mass is actually a problem as massive structures store energy. Most times, budgets are better spent on minimizing external problems and then settling for isolated, relatively lightweight structures with an airspace in between. Turning a turkey into lunch is a short term solution for an otherwise long term problem.

    You do not need 12" of air between walls. 3-4" will also do if the walls are supported in a way preventing sonic leaks.
     
  7. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Rowuk,

    Essentially my frustration is with how loud the trumpet is as an instrument, and with me not getting to practice as much as I'd like at the kind of hours that work best with my schedule, early morning, and then late at night. The booth is only intended for containing most of the sound inside. No recording issues here, I can do that at my cousins' studio.

    I may be better served here by working out some arrangement with the University (to regularly use a practice room early in the day, like 6am-8am) or with a church or some other place. I was hoping the Silent Brass system would be a good solution for these times, but it's not as good as I thougt ... with resistance differences and the other issues of, frankly, lousy sound. My Roland electronic drum kit was great sound through headphones, better than most kits, and played very much like a lively, fast kit. It was a complete solution for me (to practice drumming anytime) where the brass system isn't.

    Turtle
     
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    The frequencies that a trumpet produces are pretty easy to isolate with double walls filled with glass wool. Instead of sculptured foam, I would hang up heavy curtains all around that could be pulled back to liven the room up sometimes.
     
  9. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Not quite.

    For a recording booth you aren't worrying about external sounds as much as you are worrying about ambient reflections from the walls and corners. Anything that might leak in from an external source can be dealt with using a sound gates with no detrimental effect on the recording as long as the booth is reasonably free of outside noise - particularly vibration. Let's not forget that Bono liked to record his lead vocals in the control room with the monitors blaring - that's how he liked to hear it. Seems to me they got some pretty decent recordings that way so even what's IN the room can be handled if the sound engineer knows their business.
     
  10. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Patrick,
    I have also spent some time in the studio. The easiest time playing is when that room is not "dead". Isolated, yes, but not dead.

    For TJ it is a moot point anyway as he is not worried about ambient noise. He is worried about be able to practice around the clock and not annoying anyone else. Put me in an anechoic chamber for 10 minutes with a trumpet and I go nuts. I think in his case double walls - the second being isolated from the first and heavy curtains that can be pulled back offer the most flexibility and the lowest cost.
     

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