Source for Cork....?

Discussion in 'Vintage Trumpets / Cornets' started by jiarby, Dec 29, 2011.

  1. jiarby

    jiarby Fortissimo User

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    I would like to replace the cork on my 1959 14A Conn Cornet... it has the tall cone shaped corks that fit the bottom of the valve caps.
    Anyone have a parts source for these... and probably the bottom springs.

    Anyoen know why there is a notch cut out of the bottom??

    [​IMG]
     
  2. harleyt26

    harleyt26 Mezzo Forte User

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    The notch is to leave the valve vent hole open on my older Conns. That is why I like new corks, the splines at the base of the valve stem should hold the cork in position to leave the vent open. When the corks get old, dry and shrunken they can turn on the splines and cover the vent hole, causing sluggish valves.
     
  3. jiarby

    jiarby Fortissimo User

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    On mine there are not any splines on the stems... and the top of the valve is completely flat. I don't see how there is any way to stop the cork from spinning around as you describe.
     
  4. harleyt26

    harleyt26 Mezzo Forte User

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    Does your valves have vent holes? It must. Maybe they glue them on. Time to ask a tech.
     
  5. St. Rugglin

    St. Rugglin New Friend

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    The tech at my shop replaced the cork with plastic and capped them with felt. They work great and don't thunk. He wasn't sure where he could find cork for an old Conn. Not sure about springs.
     
  6. jiarby

    jiarby Fortissimo User

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    They are cone shaped at the top to conform with a recessed socket in the underside of the valve cap. Conn called them "anti-bounce" or something like that. They dumped them in `63 and started using flat ones.

    Yep, the valves have vent holes. I suppose I coupld put some double stick tape on the bottom of the corks... if I can find them.
     
  7. VetPsychWars

    VetPsychWars Fortissimo User

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    Not sure of the precision of it, but something to consider is bottle cork or perhaps rubber stoppers. Stoppers can come with holes in them, usually, and bottle cork might, but a hole cutter from your hardware store is cheap.

    What I would do, personally, is drive down to American Science and Surplus. :-) But, not everyone lives in Milwaukee (or Chicago).

    But I think you should be able to source bottle cork or rubber stoppers online.

    Tom
     
  8. Chuck Cox

    Chuck Cox Forte User

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    3 bottles of wine and a carving knife.
     
  9. St. Rugglin

    St. Rugglin New Friend

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    You might want to wait awhile after the consuming the three bottles before using the knife.;-)
     
  10. jiarby

    jiarby Fortissimo User

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    I don't think I would have the dexterity to carve a wine cork//

    The best way would be to rig up some kind of lathe to hold the cork and then SAND then to the correct profile.

    That is.. IF YOU HAVE TO MAKE THEM...

    I was hoping they would be something available as a part from a repair supply house or a shop.

    I already asked a local tech and he doesn't.
     

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