Speaking of the C trumpet......

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by JonathanShaw, Feb 17, 2007.

  1. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Well, it's just like the Bb trumpet. What's the lowest open tone of a C trumpet? The open tone, C, right? The same pitch on the Bb trumpet is fingered 1 and 3. Now, the the concert pitch of Bb on the Bb trumpet is fingered 0, right? That's the highest low note you can play without using valves, you follow? The highest low note on the trombone (1st position) is Bb also.

    Open= 1st positon
    2nd valve= 2nd position
    1st valve= 3rd position
    3rd or 1st and 2nd valve= 4th position
    etc.

    That will only correspond with a Bb trumpet. You can figure out pretty much any trombone part using that formula.

    here's a brain teaser: the other day I was playing along with one of our trombonists. I was playing a Bb cornet and and he was playing in alto clef (the piece was Berlioz's Roman Carnival Overture). I played in unison with him by reading his alto clef part but reading it in bass clef and adding two more sharps to the key signature.

    How did that work?

    ML
     
  2. Jimi Michiel

    Jimi Michiel Forte User

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    I hope this wasn't rhetorical...

    Alto clef makes a note equivalent to the note a step above it in treble clef. Bass clef makes a note equivalent to one two spaces above in treble clef. Therefore, reading bass clef on an alto part leaves you reading a step above concert pitch. Adding two sharps would be the correct key signature modification when reading a concert part on a B-flat instrument. How'd I do?

    -Jimi
     
  3. Jimi Michiel

    Jimi Michiel Forte User

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    maybe this is simpler


    given: note on 2nd space, no key signature
    in alto clef: B
    in bass clef: C
    in bass clef with 2 sharps: C#
    thus, reading an alto clef part in bass clef and adding 2 sharps transposes the music up a whole step
     
  4. Jimi Michiel

    Jimi Michiel Forte User

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    Here's another brain teaser:

    using only seven notes, all on the bottom line, write the notes of a C major scale
     
  5. Brekelefuw

    Brekelefuw Fortissimo User

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    C Csus2 Cmaj Csus4 G/C Cmaj6 Cmaj7





    Edit: as soon as I posted this I think I figured out the real answer.
     
  6. JonathanShaw

    JonathanShaw Pianissimo User

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    This kind of stuff makes my head hurt........ALOT
     
  7. 6pk

    6pk New Friend

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    ML

    I'm really interested in this topic with regards to Mr Vacchiano. I'm a little confused, I often hear his name as an advocate of the Bb trumpet, as if that was the trumpet he mainly played. Could I ask, was his main instrument the Bb and he used the C and D occaissionally, or was it a case of he used the C as his main instrument. Did he change mid career, just curious, I keep hearing conflicting stories from other people.
     
  8. Eclipsehornplayer

    Eclipsehornplayer Forte User

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    Thanks Manny,

    My friggin' head is now killing me! :shock:
     
  9. Richard Oliver

    Richard Oliver Forte User

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    Do a chromatic scale from middle C to low F# on the knuckels on your left hand. Count out loud with middle C as 1.

    7 positions.

    Knucklehead from WY,

    Richard
     
  10. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Vacchiano was a Bb player in the early years but used the C almost exclusively until his 50's where the D trumpet became his main horn. He always encouraged us to play whatever horn made the job easier but all our transposition studies were on the Bb.

    ML
     

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