Specific Military Band Questions

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by AaronPlaysTrumpet, Jul 5, 2012.

  1. AaronPlaysTrumpet

    AaronPlaysTrumpet New Friend

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    -Where can I find postings for auditions and their requirements?

    -I have one year left in undergraduate school and I'd like to eventually go to graduate school for conducting (most likely wind band). Does anyone with experience in military bands know if I'd be able to find the opportunity to do some conducting?

    Thanks guys!
     
  2. D.C. Al fine

    D.C. Al fine Banned

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    You will find it on the services website when there is an opening.
     
  3. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Hawaian homey
    If you are asking specifically for a conductor's position, not each service handles it the same.

    If your question is regarding being a conductor at one of the DC bands, you need to contact that band specifically. These are commissioned officer positions, so you would have to qualify first for entry into the military as an officer.

    Otherwise, all Air Force band officers are commissioned officers. You must qualify, pass an audition at the USAF Band in DC, complete Officer Training School and then you're usually assigned at a band as a deputy commander (#2 guy).

    The Army has a dual-tiered structure. One is similar to the AF. The other is to enlist in the Army as a bandsman and somewhere along the line, apply for Warrant Officer. If selected, you are awarded Warrant Officer status and become a band director. I don't believe Warrants ever become commanders of the highest level bands, although they may have staff positions at these bands, and I'm not sure if there is a normal career progression available (not that exceptions can't be made) for a Warrant to be commissioned. One difference is that one can become a Warrant Officer without having a university degree but you must have one to be a commissioned officer.

    The Navy, I believe (we've got a Navy resident here who will correct me if I'm wrong), also has the basic progression as the Army, e.g. you enlist as a bandsman. In this case, when you reach E6, you may apply for the Warrant program and become a band leader. There is a career path possibility to be commissioned as a "limited duty officer", which means that you are then a commissioned officer and you will have higher level command positions than a normal Warrant position. Again, I would assume that a LDO would have to have a university degree, although I'm not sure.

    The Marines in DC it's the same accession process as for the other services. As far as at the field level, I have no idea.

    Regarding getting some "stick time" as an enlisted player in a band, I wouldn't count on it. It could happen, but face it, that's why the band officer became a director in the first place. Traditionally, bands have a concert band which is lead by the band director and a big/dance band, which is most often lead by an enlisted guy and this is where his "stick time', (although it's more "finger poppin' time") more likely comes in.
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2012
  4. BustedChops

    BustedChops Mezzo Forte User

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    As a freelance musician you have a much better chance of enjoying yourself and getting paid than trying a military band career. Because once you sign up...it's not your music, it's big brothers.
     
  5. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    If you don't think that the wolf at your door will cause you to make some unsavory artistic choices as a civilian musician, you're being naive.
    And if you don't think that military musicians don't have a lot of autonomy over their choice of music, you're, well . . . being naive.
     
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2012
  6. BustedChops

    BustedChops Mezzo Forte User

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    Kehaulani...there is no sense in trying to achieve a career in music in an institution of war. It is futile. Freelance musicianship is no less dignified or superior to military musicianship. Great musicianship exists in both civilian and military practice. But to honestly seek and wish for a hopeful career in the military as a musician with a solid wage is likely not going to happen.

    Conservatories of music exist to study music. The military exists to promote war as the only means necessary to peace.
     
  7. chenzo

    chenzo Piano User

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    I have heard the Chinese whisper a many time...............

    That during War the Musicians are glorified stretcher bearers ( I think that this was the early wars tho).
    Now that's a thought
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2012
  8. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Neither one of you guys know what you're talking about, that's the thought.

    Busted Chops, perhaps you could describe what "a career in music" is. I don't know what your frame of reference is, but it doesn't seem right, sorry.
    Military Musician is a musical profession probably as old as civilisation, itself. You may have a disdain for war. You may have a disdain for the military. But that's a political, moral and social conviction which has nothing to do with Military Musician being a profession, in and of itself.
     
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2012
  9. D.C. Al fine

    D.C. Al fine Banned

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    Here is another thought, maybe if you give some more respect to other members you will get a little back in return.

    I have seen so many rude posts by you. Cut it out.
     
  10. chenzo

    chenzo Piano User

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    Touchy touchy
     

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