Spit

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by commakozzi, Feb 5, 2008.

  1. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,616
    7,965
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    Its clear, with anchor tonguing you have built a direct path to the mouthpiece for the spit to flow. When the tongue isn't anchored, the saliva collects at the bottom of the oral cavity and can be swallowed at convenience.

    Take a glass of water. A sip works for me.

    The angle of the trumpet should be determined by your jaw and teeth positions, nothing else. You need to keep pressure off of the top lip! Changing the position of your tongue should not change the angle of the trumpet!

    Maybe PRACTICING the following could be useful:
    in the circle of breath that I often post about we modify the following-swallow, inhale, exhale, and repeat. Once we have this down, we replace exhale with play. Build swallow into the breathing cycle - but placed at the correct time (the bottom of the circle), not in the middle of an inhale or immediately before playing.
     
  2. commakozzi

    commakozzi Pianissimo User

    218
    1
    Oct 30, 2007
    Georgia, USA
    Yeah rowuk, I kind of stumbled onto that on my own and it's working pretty well. Didn't try the water, but building the swallow into the breathing cycle has helped tremendously. I'm also taking time before an exercise to clear my mouth out with not just swallowing normally, but actually swallowing in a way that I can only describe as creating a "vacuum" in my mouth. In other words, when I swallow this way I'm trying as hard as I can to be sure that there are no air pockets in my mouth whatsoever and therefore no spit. Then I wet my lips and prepare to play the excercise. This may not be practical when you're playing long articulated passages in a performance, however. I seem to only have this problem when doing Clarkes.
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,616
    7,965
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    If you are in fact playing Clarke as intended (ppp) the explanation is clear. The air velocity is slower and that does not turn the saliva into an aerosol, hence the drips! When playing louder, the spit is blown into small particles and transported farther into the horn before recondensing.
     
  4. commakozzi

    commakozzi Pianissimo User

    218
    1
    Oct 30, 2007
    Georgia, USA
    Hmm... very interesting. I was unaware of the physics involved, but I was annoyed that I could play louder to fix the problem. Anyway, the swallowing is helping a lot with that. I forgot to mention, too, that I have the problem when doing range and endurance exercises. And that too is happening because I'm playing them at pp to p. Thanks for your help rowuk!
     
  5. veery715

    veery715 Utimate User

    5,010
    1,802
    Mar 6, 2007
    Ithaca NY
    depends on whose you're referring to!

    Are you sure you benefit from wetting your lips? That moisture may contribute to the problem. I play with dry lips, but I know there are two schools of thought on this issue.
     
  6. bilboinsa

    bilboinsa Piano User

    274
    1
    Jan 24, 2006
    San Antonio, TX
    Tonguing moves more spit closer to its exit point. Period. More tounging leads to more spit, for some of us, that is.
     

Share This Page